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Lost in Shangri-La: A True Story of Survival, Adventure, and the Most Incredible Rescue Mission of World War II

by Mitchell Zuckoff

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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1,7249410,299 (3.78)139
Award-winning former Boston Globe reporter Mitchell Zuckoff unleashes the exhilarating, untold story of an extraordinary World War II rescue mission, where a plane crash in the South Pacific plunged a trio of U.S. military personnel into the jungle-clad land of New Guinea.
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» See also 139 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 93 (next | show all)
Adventure in Paradise

"Fear is something I don't think you experience unless you have a choice. If you have a choice, then you're liable to be afraid. But without a choice, what is there to be afraid of? You just go along doing what has to be done."
After surviving a plane crash on a sight-seeing trip, a wounded trio make their way through the tropical countryside and meet up with native people.
Pretty well-written although the author sometimes adds tedious and unnecessary details. ( )
  Chrissylou62 | Apr 11, 2024 |
A good story but with far too much detail. Perhaps the author felt obliged to put every research detail into his book as a tribute to those who didn't make it out alive.

It was however a remarkable tale of foolishness, tragedy, heroism, and ingenuity in an easily forgotten part of the world during a time of much more pressing events. ( )
  dlinnen | Feb 3, 2024 |
Interesting and very fast read. Not entirely sure why...but from the way the author described the geography around "Shangri-La", I kept thinking of Islandia. It was bordered by mountainous terrain and was nearly impossible to get to. (Maybe it was just on my mind because I'd recently browsed that book again.) Anyway, the story is an amazing adventure describing the plane crash and rescue mission and once again, these guys kept diaries so we get first hand accounts. ( )
  ellink | Jan 22, 2024 |
Despite not containing very much information about actual 'WAR' (one of my favorite topics to read up on) this book was immensely enjoyable. ( )
  prasta | Jan 15, 2024 |
Only three people survive a plane crash that should not have happened. On a sightseeing tour over a place dubbed Shangri-la, an inexperienced copilot fails to clear the trees and mountain, and crashes with 24 military personnel onboard. Six survivors soon dwindle to three, two of whom are badly injured. They make their way, slowly and painfully, to a clearing where they can be seen. They need medical attention and food, and rescuing. This nonfiction account deals with the crash, and the hardships the survivors and their rescuers faced in getting everyone out of the jungle safely. They meet and make friends with some natives, though not without some trepidation. This gripping account is well told, with the audio version being read by the author. It’s a slice of history that is heart-breaking as well fascinating and astounding as the bravery of the people involved unfolds. ( )
  Maydacat | Nov 19, 2023 |
Showing 1-5 of 93 (next | show all)
Polished, fast-paced and immensely readable—ready for the big screen.
added by Shortride | editKirkus Reviews (Jan 15, 2011)
 
Mitchell Zuckoff’s “Lost in Shangri-La” delivers a feast of failures — of planning, of technology, of communication — that are resolved in a truly incredible adventure. Truly incredible? A cliché, yes, but Zuckoff’s tale is something a drunk stitches together from forgotten B movies and daydreams while clutching the bar. Zuckoff is no fabulist, though, and in this brisk book he narrates the tense yet peaceful five weeks during 1945 that three plane crash survivors spent immersed “in a world that time didn’t forget. Time never knew it existed.” Even at the level of exposition, the book is breathless.
 

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Zuckoff, MitchellAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Magny, ChristopheTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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For Gerry
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On a rainy day in May 1945, a Western Union messenger made his rounds through the quiet village of Owego, in upstate NY.
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Award-winning former Boston Globe reporter Mitchell Zuckoff unleashes the exhilarating, untold story of an extraordinary World War II rescue mission, where a plane crash in the South Pacific plunged a trio of U.S. military personnel into the jungle-clad land of New Guinea.

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