HomeGroupsTalkExplore
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

28 Barbary Lane (1990)

by Armistead Maupin

Series: Tales of the City (1-3)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
389857,609 (4.23)9
Armistead Maupin's uproarious and moving Tales of the City novels--the first three of which are collected in this omnibus volume--have earned a unique niche in American literature and are considered indelible documents of cultural change from the seventies through the first two decades of the new millennium. "These novels are as difficult to put down as a dish of pistachios. The reader starts playing the old childhood game of 'Just one more chapter and I'll turn out the lights,' only to look up and discover it's after midnight."--Los Angeles Times Book Review Originally serialized in the San Francisco Chronicle, Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (1978), More Tales of the City (1980), and Further Tales of the City (1982) afforded a mainstream audience of millions its first exposure to straight and gay characters experiencing on equal terms the follies of urban life. Among the cast of this groundbreaking saga are the lovelorn residents of 28 Barbary Lane: the bewildered but aspiring Mary Ann Singleton, the libidinous Brian Hawkins; Mona Ramsey, still in a sixties trance, Michael "Mouse" Tolliver, forever in bright-eyed pursuit of Mr. Right; and their marijuana-growing landlady, the indefatigable Mrs. Madrigal. Hurdling barriers both social and sexual, Maupin leads them through heartbreak and triumph, through nail-biting terrors and gleeful coincidences. The result is a glittering and addictive comedy of manners that continues to beguile new generations of readers.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 9 mentions

English (7)  German (1)  All languages (8)
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
I think you may have to be from the Bay Area to fully appreciate this. San Francisco is no longer the city described by Maupin. But if you would like a trip down memory lane, the San Francisco of lore is on full and accurate display in his work, that I believe was originally published as a newspaper serial, but don't quote me on it.
It's an historical snapshot of a culturally relevant time and people. ( )
  jdaneway | Apr 18, 2021 |
Had forgotten some of the qualities of the 70s in SF. And then Jim Jones and other craziness. A fun reread.
  ritaer | Mar 6, 2018 |
Ridiculous fun, even the cracktastic Further Tales of the City. ( )
  laurenbufferd | Nov 14, 2016 |
I used to read the Tales of the City books over and over when I lived in Ohio. They were a talisman for me of the life I wanted, the characters then about 10 years older than I. I haven't read them again since Ohio, and in the interim I did live in The City for a while so I had a sense of place this time that was missing from my earlier reads. This re-read was bittersweet on many levels but it still felt a lot like coming home. If you want an objective review, you'll have to go elsewhere. I love these people. ( )
  satyridae | Apr 5, 2013 |
Completely addicting. ( )
  courtb | Aug 4, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Armistead Maupin's uproarious and moving Tales of the City novels--the first three of which are collected in this omnibus volume--have earned a unique niche in American literature and are considered indelible documents of cultural change from the seventies through the first two decades of the new millennium. "These novels are as difficult to put down as a dish of pistachios. The reader starts playing the old childhood game of 'Just one more chapter and I'll turn out the lights,' only to look up and discover it's after midnight."--Los Angeles Times Book Review Originally serialized in the San Francisco Chronicle, Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City (1978), More Tales of the City (1980), and Further Tales of the City (1982) afforded a mainstream audience of millions its first exposure to straight and gay characters experiencing on equal terms the follies of urban life. Among the cast of this groundbreaking saga are the lovelorn residents of 28 Barbary Lane: the bewildered but aspiring Mary Ann Singleton, the libidinous Brian Hawkins; Mona Ramsey, still in a sixties trance, Michael "Mouse" Tolliver, forever in bright-eyed pursuit of Mr. Right; and their marijuana-growing landlady, the indefatigable Mrs. Madrigal. Hurdling barriers both social and sexual, Maupin leads them through heartbreak and triumph, through nail-biting terrors and gleeful coincidences. The result is a glittering and addictive comedy of manners that continues to beguile new generations of readers.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.23)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5
3 10
3.5 1
4 29
4.5 2
5 29

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 182,609,628 books! | Top bar: Always visible