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Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets…
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Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets and Growing Up in the 1970s (original 2006; edition 2007)

by Margaret Sartor

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2371082,757 (3.4)4
A spellbinding and authentic document of American adolescence. Set against the backdrop of the deep South in the 1970s, Miss American Pie is the unforgettable account of Margaret Sartor's life from age twelve to eighteen. A raw document crafted from diaries, notebooks, and letters, this deeply personal yet universally appealing story astonishes with its candor. Young Margaret moves with ease between the seemingly trivial concerns of hairstyles and boys to more profound questions of faith and meaning. By turns funny and poignant, heartbreaking and profound, she tackles all of the decade's issues--desegregation, drugs, the sexual revolution, the rise of feminism, and the spread of charismatic evangelical Christianity--with humor, frankness, and unexpected insight. Miss American Pie reminds us what it feels like to grow up, offering a true and honest look at a teenager grappling with the timeless questions of sex, friendship, God, love, loss, and the meaning of family. The introduction and epilogue, written by Sartor from an older perspective, reflect on those turbulent and life-shaping years, revealing how the girl in the diary turned out after all, and demonstrating that childhood--both its joys and traumas--reverberate deeply in our adult lives.… (more)
Member:kristinhays
Title:Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets and Growing Up in the 1970s
Authors:Margaret Sartor
Info:Bloomsbury USA (2007), Paperback, 288 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:books of 2010

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Miss American Pie: A Diary of Love, Secrets and Growing Up in the 1970s by Margaret Sartor (2006)

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» See also 4 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
Really, the author should have written a memoir, and used the years since to add some insight into her life and the times she was living in. I find rereading my own diaries somewhat boring, and mine are wayyyyy more interesting than this! ( )
  Rdra1962 | Aug 1, 2018 |
This book wasn't what I was expecting. I thought it would be more like "Little Miss Sunshine," but it really was just excerpts from a teenager's diary. ( )
  DBrigandi | Jul 3, 2017 |
Pretty good memoir about growing up in the 1970s. Sartor consulted her old diaries and letters to reconstruct this moment in time. I'm always up for a memoir, and this one was worth the trip. It felt very authentic. ( )
  satyridae | Apr 5, 2013 |
Reviewed by Marta Morrison for TeensReadToo.com

This was a good book. It is an actual journal of the author written in the seventies. I graduated from high school and college in the seventies so I could relate to many of the references made in the journal. I think today's girls could also relate, though, because the themes in the journals are the same struggles that today's teens go through.

It starts when Margaret is in the seventh grade and goes through her senior year. At first the entries are brief and some are quite funny. Later they get more poignant.

Margaret is boy crazy, bored, rebellious, and is trying to figure out what she believes. In the seventies, we had many issues involving desegregation, drugs, sex -- it was the era of the sexual revolution, feminism, and the big mega-churches were founded and grew in that decade. I laughed at many of the entries, especially when she would write of some profound event and not elaborate and the next entry would be something very trivial.

For example: November 8 -- Nixon was elected president. November 9 -- Everyone says me and Vernon would make a good couple. (Nixon being elected president was exciting and had worldwide ramifications but her and Vernon being a good couple didn't last more than a week.) Another example: August 8 -- President Nixon resigned; made appointment to get my hair cut.

I love that entry. It is such a teen statement. MISS AMERICAN PIE is realistic and fun to read. Plus, it makes you want to start a journal, too. ( )
1 vote | GeniusJen | Oct 12, 2009 |
Margaret Sartor grew up in Montgomery, Louisiana, coming of age during the 1970s. Through the entire journey of her adolescence, she kept a diary recounting her joys (friendships, horse rides. religious rapture) and her struggles (boyfriend angst and frizzy hair). Her entries are always frank and often funny.

I just wished for a little more reflection and substance. The author provided some context at the beginning and end of the book, but the majority consisted of just diary entries, often very short ones. Taken together, they give us a partial sense of the girl and the world she lived in, but I was left wanting a more complete picture. ( )
1 vote infinitechoice | Aug 19, 2009 |
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A spellbinding and authentic document of American adolescence. Set against the backdrop of the deep South in the 1970s, Miss American Pie is the unforgettable account of Margaret Sartor's life from age twelve to eighteen. A raw document crafted from diaries, notebooks, and letters, this deeply personal yet universally appealing story astonishes with its candor. Young Margaret moves with ease between the seemingly trivial concerns of hairstyles and boys to more profound questions of faith and meaning. By turns funny and poignant, heartbreaking and profound, she tackles all of the decade's issues--desegregation, drugs, the sexual revolution, the rise of feminism, and the spread of charismatic evangelical Christianity--with humor, frankness, and unexpected insight. Miss American Pie reminds us what it feels like to grow up, offering a true and honest look at a teenager grappling with the timeless questions of sex, friendship, God, love, loss, and the meaning of family. The introduction and epilogue, written by Sartor from an older perspective, reflect on those turbulent and life-shaping years, revealing how the girl in the diary turned out after all, and demonstrating that childhood--both its joys and traumas--reverberate deeply in our adult lives.

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