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Artefacts in Roman Britain: Their Purpose and Use

by Lindsay Allason-Jones (Editor)

Other authors: Joanna Bird (Contributor), M.C. Bishop (Contributor), R.J. Brickstock (Contributor), H.E.M. Cool (Contributor), Nina Crummy (Contributor)7 more, Hella Eckardt (Contributor), Ralph Jackson (Contributor), W.H. Manning (Contributor), Quita Mould (Contributor), Sian Rees (Contributor), Ellen Swift (Contributor), R.S.O. Tomlin (Contributor)

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"Roman Britain has given us an enormous number of artefacts. Yet few books available today deal with its whole material culture as represented by these artefacts. This introduction, aimed primarily at students and general readers, begins by explaining the process of identifying objects of any period or material. Themed chapters, written by experts in their particular area of interest, then discuss artefacts from the point of view of their use. The contributors' premise is that every object was designed for a particular purpose, which may have been to satisfy a general need or the specific need of an individual. If the latter, the maker, the owner and the end user may have been one and the same person; if the former, the manufacturer had to provide objects that others would wish to purchase or exchange. Understanding this reveals a fascinating picture of life in Roman Britain"--… (more)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Allason-Jones, LindsayEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bird, JoannaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bishop, M.C.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brickstock, R.J.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cool, H.E.M.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Crummy, NinaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Eckardt, HellaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Jackson, RalphContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Manning, W.H.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mould, QuitaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rees, SianContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Swift, EllenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tomlin, R.S.O.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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"Roman Britain has given us an enormous number of artefacts. Yet few books available today deal with its whole material culture as represented by these artefacts. This introduction, aimed primarily at students and general readers, begins by explaining the process of identifying objects of any period or material. Themed chapters, written by experts in their particular area of interest, then discuss artefacts from the point of view of their use. The contributors' premise is that every object was designed for a particular purpose, which may have been to satisfy a general need or the specific need of an individual. If the latter, the maker, the owner and the end user may have been one and the same person; if the former, the manufacturer had to provide objects that others would wish to purchase or exchange. Understanding this reveals a fascinating picture of life in Roman Britain"--

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