HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Once We Were Brothers: A Novel (Liam Taggart…
Loading...

Once We Were Brothers: A Novel (Liam Taggart and Catherine Lockhart, 1) (original 2010; edition 2013)

by Ronald H. Balson (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6484827,621 (4.06)40
"The gripping tale about two boys, once as close as brothers, who find themselves on opposite sides of the Holocaust. Elliot Rosenzweig, a respected civic leader and wealthy philanthropist, is attending a fundraiser when he is suddenly accosted and accused of being a former Nazi SS officer named Otto Piatek, "the butcher of Zamosc." Although the charges are denounced as preposterous, his accuser, Ben Solomon, is convinced he is right. Solomon persuades attorney Catherine Lockhart to take his case, revealing that the true Piatek was abandoned as a child and raised by Solomon's family only to betray them during the Nazi occupation. But has he accused the right man? Once We Were Brothers is the compelling tale of two boys and a family who struggle to survive in war-torn Poland and a young love that incredibly endures through the unspeakable cruelty of the Holocaust. Two lives, two worlds, and sixty years converge in an explosive race to redemption that makes for an enthralling tale of love, survival, and ultimately the triumph of the human spirit"--… (more)
Member:LaMill29
Title:Once We Were Brothers: A Novel (Liam Taggart and Catherine Lockhart, 1)
Authors:Ronald H. Balson (Author)
Info:St. Martin's Griffin (2013), Edition: 9.8.2013, 400 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Once We Were Brothers by Richard H. Balson (2010)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 40 mentions

English (42)  Italian (3)  German (2)  All languages (47)
Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
A new series for me that I know I am going to enjoy curling up with.

Book one introduces Liam, a gumshoe and Catherine, an attorney. The author does not hide that they have a past life and so you know at some point the sparks will fly. However, the meat of story revolves around Ben Solomon. A survivor of Nazi Germany. Ben has uncovered a Nazi living within his orbit (Chicago) and he and Liam convince Catherine to file a civil suit.

The story is told mostly by Ben, both present and past. I loved how the author incorporated this technique. Ben sitting and relating the story to Catherine and Liam. I did not feel the jumpiness that a lot of stories told this way fall into.

Historical accuracy is a big thing for me-and this author has done his research. I was highly satisfied with this read. and would recommend to anyone who loves historical fiction. ( )
  JBroda | Sep 24, 2021 |
Ben Solomon, an elderly retiree, threatens a city scion (Elliot Rosenzweig) with a gun, accusing him of being Nazi killer, Otto Piatek, known as the "Butcher of Zamosc". Introduced by a mutual friend, litigator Catherine Lockhart agrees to listen to Ben's rambling story, which starts with Otto being raised by his family when his parents could not afford to feed him. The story itself was very emotional: Ben's family, his all-conquering love for his deceased wife, Catherine's decision to quit her law firm to help Ben. At times, the sequencing between Otto's rise in the SS and the persecution of Jews in Poland and the current legal wrangling in Chicago. Just when things are bleakest, Ben's wife Hannah provides the key insights from the great beyond. ( )
  skipstern | Jul 11, 2021 |
An interesting story...but it was told as a history lesson. ( )
  Chrissylou62 | Aug 1, 2020 |
Loved it. Compelled you keep reading - Loved the characters (except for the ones I hated - but even they were great characters!). Great work of fiction in one of the time periods that I enjoy. ( )
  nwieme | Mar 19, 2020 |
This is a debut novel from this Author and was recommended to me for review by a Polish survivor of the camps.

I was pulled into this book from the first chapter, and found myself returning to read more at every opportunity I got. However, the characters portrayed in the book came across as being rather flat. The person I perceived as being the main protagonist was under-developed and could have been given so much more depth by the Author; there seemed to be so much more that could have been written into his background that would have turned him from the old befuddled fool that came out of the pages into a strong and resilient character that showed the human spirit can endure things we never think possible. Certain players in this novel professed to know nothing about the Holocaust, and this added an air of incredulity to the novel. I felt that if the Author had invested more time into the development of their characters, and explored the complexity of the human soul, they would have turned this book around and made it into something more than it actually is. Readers need to be aware that there are also some characters thrown into this book that are never heard from again, making one wonder what the point of including them in the first place actually was. Unless the Author was trying in some way to reflect how people suddenly ‘vanished’ during these years, it may have been better not to include them at all rather than to leave the reader wondering what happened to them and how the events taking place affected them. I really couldn’t connect with any of the characters in this novel, and that is not because I’ve not walked the path they did, it was just because they were so one-dimensional with no endearing traits at all.

Taking place in two eras, World War II and the present day, it was hard to accept that they were part of the same novel. In writing this book it is apparent that the Author spent a great deal of time researching the historical aspects of the pogrom in Poland, but not nearly enough time as some of the things that are written as facts are actually a little off skew. Despite this the historical parts of the book are extremely well written, and it was these parts more than anything that made this a page turner for me; to the point where when the storyline returned to modern day, I just wanted to hurry through them to get back to the past. In comparison to the skilful way in which the Author wrote about World War II, its run up and the way it affected the Jews in Poland, the modern day storyline was rather weakly written, and it is in this portion of the book that I found the plot to be rather predictable.

I wouldn’t say this was a must read for anyone that is interested in this period of time, and the depravity that accompanied it in some countries in Europe, but I will recommend it as a book that breathes a new life into a dismal subject as it looks at this whole area from a different viewpoint. Unfortunately, it could have used the talents of an expert editor in many places to polish out the rather amateurish feel it had, and this is what led to my rating it as I have.


Originally reviewed on: http://catesbooknuthut.com/2014/02/03/review-once-we-were-brothers-ronald-h-bals...





This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
( )
  TheAcorn | Nov 8, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Richard H. Balsonprimary authorall editionscalculated
Berman, FredNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Storrings, MichaelCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To my wife, Monica, with whom I dance through life.
First words
Ben Solomon stood before his bathroom mirror fumbling with his bow tie.
Quotations
The doors of decision are one-way only. You can never go back.
They chip away and they chip away, taking your rights and dignity a piece at a time...
...even in the midst of a world gone mad, you can find hope to hold on to—things to look forward to. The human spirit is enduringly resilient.
Find a reason to turn your nose up at a culture, to denigrate a people because they’re different, and it’s not such a giant leap from ethnic subjugation to ethnic slaughter.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"The gripping tale about two boys, once as close as brothers, who find themselves on opposite sides of the Holocaust. Elliot Rosenzweig, a respected civic leader and wealthy philanthropist, is attending a fundraiser when he is suddenly accosted and accused of being a former Nazi SS officer named Otto Piatek, "the butcher of Zamosc." Although the charges are denounced as preposterous, his accuser, Ben Solomon, is convinced he is right. Solomon persuades attorney Catherine Lockhart to take his case, revealing that the true Piatek was abandoned as a child and raised by Solomon's family only to betray them during the Nazi occupation. But has he accused the right man? Once We Were Brothers is the compelling tale of two boys and a family who struggle to survive in war-torn Poland and a young love that incredibly endures through the unspeakable cruelty of the Holocaust. Two lives, two worlds, and sixty years converge in an explosive race to redemption that makes for an enthralling tale of love, survival, and ultimately the triumph of the human spirit"--

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.06)
0.5 1
1 3
1.5
2 5
2.5 5
3 20
3.5 10
4 54
4.5 7
5 61

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Berwick Court Publishing Co.

2 editions of this book were published by Berwick Court Publishing Co..

Editions: 0615351913, 0615341225

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 163,238,275 books! | Top bar: Always visible