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The Water Hole by Graeme Base
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The Water Hole (2001)

by Graeme Base

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7122318,921 (4.44)2

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Showing 1-5 of 23 (next | show all)
This book had some of the best illustrations I have seen in awhile. They were very detailed and really would grasp anyones attention no matter the age reading the book. I like how the story started positive and ended on a positive note, because during the middle of the book the story had a negative outlook. ( )
  Mackenziesophia | Jan 13, 2018 |
Add, I agree, who can resist these illustrations? You would find something new each time you read it! "Who can resist the allure of the hidden wilderness water hole? Certainly not one rhino. Not two tigers. Nor three toucans. Pretty soon the delicious pool is drawing moose, catfish, pandas, tortoises... and more than 100 other critters from Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and beyond. But is it our imagination or is that rhino-sized water hole dwindling to a mere shadow of its former self, a puddle not fit for eight ladybugs, let alone 10 kangaroos? As the seasons change across the world, and the animals get thirstier, the water supply diminishes. Eventually, even the flowery-shirted frog that has stoically lingered through the drought packs his suitcase and takes off. The only hope now is a drop of rain on the parched earth..."
  HoughHouse | Jul 21, 2017 |
The Water Hole has amazing illustrations. The pages have a water hole on each two page spreed. there is a cut out portion of the water hole adding depth to the picture. Different animals for different countries each visit to water hole. with each animal the number raises from one to ten. as the number of animals rise the water hole shrinks. There are animal hidden in the background. "As ever-growing number of animals visit a watering hole, introducing the number from one to ten, the water dwindles."
  Andews | Jul 15, 2017 |
Conversion: Can you count the animals? What other animals do you think needs water?

I can teach onomatopoeia and parentheses. The structure can be used to write a class book on another science topic or just animals. #Science ( )
  phamvunancy | Jul 5, 2017 |
Different groups of animals come to the watering hole to delight in the delicious water. But as time passes, the watering hole grows smaller and smaller...

This is an interesting book because there is so much going on with it. It is a counting book, with each page showing an increasing number of animals from one to 10. Each page also shows the watering hole getting smaller through use of a cutaway illustration, something just different enough from your usual picture book that children will find it very appealing. The illustrations are, as is to be expected from Graeme Base, realistically detailed and stunningly beautiful. In addition, in the typical Base style of including a little challenge, there is an added bonus of border images that contain silhouetted animals, allowing readers to spend tons of extra time exploring all of these.

I read this book aloud to my 6-year-old niece, who enjoyed listening to it and requested it again as well. I could also see this working well in a preschool or elementary classroom setting for lessons on the environment in general and the water cycle in particular. Or it's just a good title to share with a group that particularly likes animals (which is most children, isn't it?). ( )
  sweetiegherkin | Feb 24, 2017 |
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Book description
This book told the story of many different breed of animals in the wild all drinking out of one drinking hole. As the different kind of animals come up to drink the water they notice that the hole is getting smaller and smaller. Soon enough there is no water left at the drinking hole and all the animals leave that area. Not too long after all the animals have left the area, a big storm comes in and it rains and rains and rains. Soon after all the rain has come in the water hole is full again and all the animals soon return to gather around the water hole to drink there water.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0810945681, Hardcover)

Who can resist the allure of the hidden wilderness water hole? Certainly not one rhino. Not two tigers. Nor three toucans. Pretty soon the delicious pool is drawing moose, catfish, pandas, tortoises... and more than 100 other critters from Africa, Asia, Europe, North America, and beyond. But is it our imagination or is that rhino-sized water hole dwindling to a mere shadow of its former self, a puddle not fit for eight ladybugs, let alone 10 kangaroos? As the seasons change across the world, and the animals get thirstier, the water supply diminishes. Eventually, even the flowery-shirted frog that has stoically lingered through the drought packs his suitcase and takes off. The only hope now is a drop of rain on the parched earth...

With his usual elaborate detail, Graeme Base, mad genius behind Animalia, The Eleventh Hour: A Curious Mystery, and other wild and wonderful titles, presents a one-of-a-kind counting book. Naturally, Base would never be content to stick with a simple 1 through 10 format. Readers of all ages will linger over each spread, first counting the highlighted animals and giggling at the translation of their grunts and growls (the moose's "Moo, moo, mooooooiii!" means "Hey, get your hoof out of my ear!"). Then it's time to check out the diminishing size of the die-cut hole in the pond. And finally, readers will want to find each of the 10 additional animals cleverly hidden in every illustration, based on the silhouetted creatures in the border. A safari on paper--with an environmental and mathematical education thrown in for good measure. (Ages 4 to 8) --Emilie Coulter

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:59:18 -0400)

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As ever growing numbers of animals visit a watering hole, introducing the numbers from one to ten, the water dwindles.

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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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