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Gabby: A Fighter Pilot's Life: Frances…
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Gabby: A Fighter Pilot's Life: Frances Gabreski as told to (original 1991; edition 1991)

by Carl Molesworth (Author)

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524431,938 (3.88)None
If ever a man has earned his place in the annals of military history, that man is Francis "Gabby" Gabreski. His exploits as a fighter pilot in World War II and Korea are legendary; his rise from humble beginnings to success in military and business careers is inspiring. This is the full story of Gabby Gabreski, told in his own words. Gabreski's life is a classic American success story. Born to Polish immigrant parents in 1919, he nearly washed out of Notre Dame and then flight school. He was down to his last chance, and he made the most of it. A witness to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Gabby had his own first taste of air combat flying with a Polish RAF squadron. Shortly thereafter he joined the 56th Fighter Group of the U.S. 8th Air Force, and in seventeen months he shot down twenty-eight German planes, the highest total of any 8th Air Force pilot in Europe. He became a hero whose name was splashed across newspaper headlines from coast to coast. And then, on the very day he was to fly home to his fiancee and a hero's welcome, he took one last combat mission, crashed and, after a daring attempt to avoid capture, finished the war in a POW camp. Gabreski returned to combat in 1951, flying F-86 Sabrejets over Korea. He scored 6.5 more victories there, making him one of the few pilots ever to achieve ace status in two wars and in both propeller and jet aircraft. He retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1967 and spent the next twenty years working in the aviation industry, sustained, as always, by his devout religious faith and his deep love for his family. Now, drawing on his private documents and photographs, Gabby, along with writer Carl Molesworth, tells his thrilling eyewitness story with a candor and a vivid style that should earn this brave pilot a whole new generation of admirers. 200 b/w photos… (more)
Member:BrandonVanNess
Title:Gabby: A Fighter Pilot's Life: Frances Gabreski as told to
Authors:Carl Molesworth (Author)
Info:Crown (1991), Edition: 1st, 277 pages
Collections:Your library
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Gabby : a fighter pilot's life by Francis S. Gabreski (1991)

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Francis Gabreski January 28, 1919 – January 31, 2002) was a Polish-American career pilot in the United States Air Force who retired as a colonel after 26 years of military service. He was the top American and United States Army Air Forces fighter ace over Europe during World War II and a jet fighter ace with the Air Force in the Korean War. Although best known for his credited destruction of 34½ aircraft in aerial combat and being one of only seven U.S. combat pilots to become an ace in two wars, Gabreski was also one of the Air Force's most accomplished leaders. In addition to commanding two fighter squadrons, he had six command tours at group or wing level, including one in combat in Korea, totaling over 11 years of command and 15 overall in operational fighter assignments.
  MasseyLibrary | May 30, 2021 |
Francis Gabreski January 28, 1919 – January 31, 2002) was a Polish-American career pilot in the United States Air Force who retired as a colonel after 26 years of military service. He was the top American and United States Army Air Forces fighter ace over Europe during World War II and a jet fighter ace with the Air Force in the Korean War. Although best known for his credited destruction of 34½ aircraft in aerial combat and being one of only seven U.S. combat pilots to become an ace in two wars, Gabreski was also one of the Air Force's most accomplished leaders. In addition to commanding two fighter squadrons, he had six command tours at group or wing level, including one in combat in Korea, totaling over 11 years of command and 15 overall in operational fighter assignments.
  MasseyLibrary | May 30, 2021 |
Probably only of interest to the biggest of military history buffs, but this was still very good. A Catholic guy who went to Notre Dame, dropped out to fly for the air force (Army Air Corps). This guy really was everywhere: one of the few guys who got up in the air at Pearl Harbor, went to fly with the Polish pilots in Spitfires over England, became a high scoring ace in Thunderbolts, was captured by the Germans on his last combat mission, went to fly in Korea and became an ace there in Sabre’s. I learned a lot about military doctrine during WWII. Early on, much of it was wrong. Air power was initially based on bombers and fighters were really only interceptors to stop bombers from reaching their targets. Once the US learned that its B-17 bombers were vulnerable to fighters, the US used its interceptors as fighter escorts. The skill of the German pilots decreased as more and more of them were shot down. Amazing stories and definitely worth reading if you can get through the military lingo. Gabreski lived in Santa Monica briefly and on bases all over California, including LA (Edwards) and ends his career as the highest scoring ace in the history of the US Air Force. Bibliography, b & w photos, limited index. ( )
  sacredheart25 | Feb 17, 2014 |
Looks like a coffee table book but it's really a great story of a guy who nearly washed out of flight school but went on to be one of the best fighter pilots of WW2. ( )
  FlyingSinger | Jan 18, 2006 |
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Francis S. Gabreskiprimary authorall editionscalculated
Molesworth, Carlsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

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To the fighter pilots of the 56th Fighter Group who made it possible for the bomber pilots -their "big friends"- to do the job and paid the supreme price.
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The late summer sun was dropping toward the horizon as I left the airfield and started walking toward the town.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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If ever a man has earned his place in the annals of military history, that man is Francis "Gabby" Gabreski. His exploits as a fighter pilot in World War II and Korea are legendary; his rise from humble beginnings to success in military and business careers is inspiring. This is the full story of Gabby Gabreski, told in his own words. Gabreski's life is a classic American success story. Born to Polish immigrant parents in 1919, he nearly washed out of Notre Dame and then flight school. He was down to his last chance, and he made the most of it. A witness to the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Gabby had his own first taste of air combat flying with a Polish RAF squadron. Shortly thereafter he joined the 56th Fighter Group of the U.S. 8th Air Force, and in seventeen months he shot down twenty-eight German planes, the highest total of any 8th Air Force pilot in Europe. He became a hero whose name was splashed across newspaper headlines from coast to coast. And then, on the very day he was to fly home to his fiancee and a hero's welcome, he took one last combat mission, crashed and, after a daring attempt to avoid capture, finished the war in a POW camp. Gabreski returned to combat in 1951, flying F-86 Sabrejets over Korea. He scored 6.5 more victories there, making him one of the few pilots ever to achieve ace status in two wars and in both propeller and jet aircraft. He retired from the Air Force as a colonel in 1967 and spent the next twenty years working in the aviation industry, sustained, as always, by his devout religious faith and his deep love for his family. Now, drawing on his private documents and photographs, Gabby, along with writer Carl Molesworth, tells his thrilling eyewitness story with a candor and a vivid style that should earn this brave pilot a whole new generation of admirers. 200 b/w photos

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