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Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment and the Prison Industrial Complex

by Eric A. Stanley

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2022102,969 (4.44)2
Pathologized, terrorized, and confined, trans/gender-non-conforming and queer folks have always struggled against the enormity of the prison industrial complex. The first collection of its kind, Eric A. Stanley and Nat Smith bring together current and former prisoners, activists, and academics to offer new ways for understanding how race, gender, ability, and sexuality are lived under the crushing weight of captivity. Through a politic of gender self-determination, this collection argues that trans/queer liberation and prison abolition must be grown together. From rioting against police violence and critiquing hate crimes legislation, to prisoners demanding access to HIV medications, and far beyond, Captive Genders is a challenge for us all to join the struggle.… (more)
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GOD this collection was just so, so wildly good. So many incredibly thoughtful pieces, so much thoughtful, careful work from folks on the inside and out. The pieces I keep returning to in thinking, that really shifted my thought, were Erica R. Meiner's piece on sex offenders, and Lori Girshick's piece on masculine women and transmascs in prison, both of which raised a huge number of questions for me and which I will keep returning to again and again.

That's not to say they were the only two good pieces in the book; every single essay was full of so much to think about, and experience to hold and be grounded in. The stories that folks on the inside had were of course incredibly brutal, and all pieces hammered home that in fact reform--like housing trans people according to their gender--does not necessarily decrease the violence that incarcerated trans people face, especially if that means that more money gets poured into prisons.

Definitely recommend this for anyone thinking about prison abolition, and for queer folks in general to think about what we owe our queer and trans siblings who are incarcerated. ( )
  aijmiller | Dec 14, 2020 |
A much-needed book on a very invisible topic. Some of the pieces were more academic/less accessible, making me wonder *who* the book is directed towards (I mean, academics can still read regular ol' prose, right?), but still very much a must-read for those involved in prison or transformative justice work. ( )
  VikkiLaw | Apr 4, 2013 |
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Pathologized, terrorized, and confined, trans/gender-non-conforming and queer folks have always struggled against the enormity of the prison industrial complex. The first collection of its kind, Eric A. Stanley and Nat Smith bring together current and former prisoners, activists, and academics to offer new ways for understanding how race, gender, ability, and sexuality are lived under the crushing weight of captivity. Through a politic of gender self-determination, this collection argues that trans/queer liberation and prison abolition must be grown together. From rioting against police violence and critiquing hate crimes legislation, to prisoners demanding access to HIV medications, and far beyond, Captive Genders is a challenge for us all to join the struggle.

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