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How to Be a Woman (2011)

by Caitlin Moran

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2,5641664,346 (3.78)164
Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven't been burned as witches since 1727, life isn't exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women. They are beset by uncertainties and questions: Why are they supposed to get Brazilians? Why do bras hurt? Why the incessant talk about babies? And do men secretly hate them? Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women's lives with laugh-out-loud funny scenes from her own, from the riot of adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, and mother. With rapier wit, Moran slices right to the truth--whether it's about the workplace, strip clubs, love, fat, abortion, popular entertainment, or childred--to jump-start a new conversation about feminism. With humor, insight, and verve, How To Be a Woman lays bare the reasons why female rights and empowerment are essential issues not only for women today but also for society itself.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 162 (next | show all)
Good for a laugh and good to know that such an enthusiastic (strident) feminist is out there. I enjoyed her personal reflections and was agog to imagine growing up in those circs. I enjoyed reading most of her opinions even if I couldn't agree with all her generalizations. ( )
  Je9 | Aug 10, 2021 |
I picked this book up and quickly thought it sounded a lot like Jenny Lawon's writing, so I was instantly hooked. I appreciate the 'new' (to me) perspectives of what it means to be a feminist, and simply a quirky woman. Worth the read. ( )
  cwells3 | Jul 28, 2021 |
How To Be A Woman is the kind of delightful surprise you get once in awhile when you work in a library. I'd never heard of the book or the author when I happened to notice it on the shelf, had no preconceived notions about it to color my perceptions, and thoroughly enjoyed Caitlin Moran's brash and hilarious take on feminism. Now I'm tempted to pay for a digital subscription to the Times of London (where she is a columnist) just to keep her in my life! Luckily, she has a collection of columns already published called Moranthology, so that should keep me busy for awhile. The points Moran makes here are often serious, well-reasoned, and important, but she seems to always have one foot firmly planted on a banana peel as she makes them, which, to me, is quite a winning combination! ( )
  CaitlinMcC | Jul 11, 2021 |
I would have enjoyed this book more if it were simply a memoir, but I bristled often when Moran started to generalize between the sexes and spoke AT the reader, especially on feminist "issues" that seemed rather insignificant. I did agree with her on several topics, but she seemed rather unforgiving of the notion that not all women have to be like her to be a feminist. I like how she details how her youth informed her identity as a feminist, but by large, they were nothing like my experiences, and it alienated me that she enforced her conclusions as the reader's conclusions. There were times, too, that her facts needed a little checking, which made her assertions lose steam. It got to a point where I started skipping to just read the chapters on topics I care about...which turned out to be the ones on why to have kids, not have kids, and abortion (I found her reflections on motherhood more interesting than her childhood)...and reading reviews here on Goodreads of what I missed doesn't make me regret my decision to do so. I'm relieved she acknowledged that it doesn't make one any less of a woman for not having kids, and I really commend her for acknowledging that deciding to have an abortion isn't always a difficult decision. I doubt that her message will get through to anyone who doesn't already agree with her, but still, it was so EFFING gratifying to read. ( )
  LibroLindsay | Jun 18, 2021 |
Gostei bastante, o livro é bem engraçado abordando pontos importantes na vida de uma mulher.
Mais biografia do que manifesto, ela faz reflexões sobre eventos ocorridos na vida dela, os quais se assemelham a de muita gente. ( )
  megwatrin | Mar 11, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 162 (next | show all)
The joy of this book is just that: the joy. What Moran is really arguing for is more female happiness. Women spend too much of their time worrying, beating themselves up, going along with time-wasting, restrictive, often expensive, sexist mores. The triumph of How To Be A Woman is that it adds to women's confidence. It reminds us that sexism, and all that is associated with it, is not only repressive, it is tedious and stupid. It is boring. Best give it a body swerve and get on with having fun
 
Great job author, I really like your writing style. I suggest you join N0velStar’s writing competition, you might be their next big star.
added by Gab_Cruz | editbook
 
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[Prologue] Wolverhapmton, April 5, 1988
So, I had assumed it was optional.
[Postscript] So do I know how to be a woman now?
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"Pencil skirts, skin-tight jeans and leggings - they all allow us to witness an exact outline of the wearer's pants, rather like the 'Geo-Phys print-out of an ancient drainage system on Time Team."
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Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven't been burned as witches since 1727, life isn't exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women. They are beset by uncertainties and questions: Why are they supposed to get Brazilians? Why do bras hurt? Why the incessant talk about babies? And do men secretly hate them? Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women's lives with laugh-out-loud funny scenes from her own, from the riot of adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, and mother. With rapier wit, Moran slices right to the truth--whether it's about the workplace, strip clubs, love, fat, abortion, popular entertainment, or childred--to jump-start a new conversation about feminism. With humor, insight, and verve, How To Be a Woman lays bare the reasons why female rights and empowerment are essential issues not only for women today but also for society itself.

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