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How to Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran
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How to Be a Woman (original 2011; edition 2012)

by Caitlin Moran (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,6171714,336 (3.79)164
Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven't been burned as witches since 1727, life isn't exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women. They are beset by uncertainties and questions: Why are they supposed to get Brazilians? Why do bras hurt? Why the incessant talk about babies? And do men secretly hate them? Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women's lives with laugh-out-loud funny scenes from her own, from the riot of adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, and mother. With rapier wit, Moran slices right to the truth--whether it's about the workplace, strip clubs, love, fat, abortion, popular entertainment, or childred--to jump-start a new conversation about feminism. With humor, insight, and verve, How To Be a Woman lays bare the reasons why female rights and empowerment are essential issues not only for women today but also for society itself.… (more)
Member:PaMi.Eliza
Title:How to Be a Woman
Authors:Caitlin Moran (Author)
Info:Harper Perennial (2012), 320 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
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Work Information

How to Be a Woman by Caitlin Moran (2011)

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  3. 00
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» See also 164 mentions

English (167)  Dutch (1)  Spanish (1)  German (1)  Swedish (1)  All languages (171)
Showing 1-5 of 167 (next | show all)
audio nonfiction, read by the author (8 hours, 45 min)
  reader1009 | Jan 21, 2022 |
I loved it and I would have loved it even more if didn't have the 'memoir' parts. I didn't find them in the least bit interesting; I didn't care about Caitlin Moran's wedding or about every pair of shoes she had bought and never worn and now described them in freaking details.

But I absolutely loved her take on feminism, on women's rights, life choices, world view etc etc etc. I found it funny, smart and very uplifting and inspiring. ( )
  alissee | Dec 8, 2021 |
I. Love. This. Book. Why? Well, let's start with all the reviews I've read of it. This is a love it or hate it book, so lots of 5 star and lots of 1 star reviews. The best part, all of the reviews, high or low, intelligently (or at least thoughtfully) explain the reasons for the love or the hate. AND ALL OF THOSE REASONS HAVE TO DO WITH FEMINISM. We are discussing feminism. On Goodreads. How can that be anything but good.

Second, I love that this book makes me feel that I am normal. That I might just be a woman and not have known it for a while. I don't have it all together; I'm only beginning to figure out how to look at myself in a mirror without seeing a list of problems to fix. But, I have done things, and fixed things, and learned things, and have tried to take some of my share back from the patriarchy, dammit. I AM A STRIDENT FEMINIST. Regardless of whether I like handbags and shoes and the occasional frilly accessory. And that's what I love about this book. What I devoured it within a span of 20 hours. My problem with those one star reviews is that they are taking this thing way too seriously. Why can't feminism be fun? Why can't feminism be full of inappropriate language and some flat-out bitching, and revelation of our inner lives?

One of the seemingly most contentious parts of this book, according to reviews, is not the frank discussion of the positive consequences of an abortion, or the chapter about the subtle sexism that just happens without people immediately realizing it's happened until, suddenly, you're faced with the thought that, hey, maybe that was sexism. No, instead, the most controversial part of the book seems to be the discussion about women's need to have something to call their lady bits. Which, quite frankly, is a discussion I feel like I've been having since 8th grade. But I love that this is what is causing 1 star reviews. This says, to me, that the other, arguably more 'feminist' parts of the book are regarded not as controversial, but as discussions we should already be having.

This book is not going to be for everyone. Moran's writing is in your face, often includes curse words, frank discussions of sexuality, body hair, and employs a great deal of all-caps, exclamation-pointed fragments. But I do hope it is something every woman would be willing to read, if for no other reason than to hate it and disagree with everything Moran says. Because that is where feminism truly is, isn't it? In the formation, discussion, and ownership of one's opinions and the belief that these opinions matter. ( )
1 vote JessicaReadsThings | Dec 2, 2021 |
A witty, validating read for the modern woman, or man! You may gain a new perspective while being entertained, there's nothing to lose. ( )
  kristilabrie | Dec 1, 2021 |
Very funny and full of important life advice. ( )
  _Marcia_94_ | Sep 21, 2021 |
Showing 1-5 of 167 (next | show all)
The joy of this book is just that: the joy. What Moran is really arguing for is more female happiness. Women spend too much of their time worrying, beating themselves up, going along with time-wasting, restrictive, often expensive, sexist mores. The triumph of How To Be A Woman is that it adds to women's confidence. It reminds us that sexism, and all that is associated with it, is not only repressive, it is tedious and stupid. It is boring. Best give it a body swerve and get on with having fun
 
Great job author, I really like your writing style. I suggest you join N0velStar’s writing competition, you might be their next big star.
added by Gab_Cruz | editbook
 
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[Prologue] Wolverhapmton, April 5, 1988
So, I had assumed it was optional.
[Postscript] So do I know how to be a woman now?
Quotations
"Pencil skirts, skin-tight jeans and leggings - they all allow us to witness an exact outline of the wearer's pants, rather like the 'Geo-Phys print-out of an ancient drainage system on Time Team."
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Though they have the vote and the Pill and haven't been burned as witches since 1727, life isn't exactly a stroll down the catwalk for modern women. They are beset by uncertainties and questions: Why are they supposed to get Brazilians? Why do bras hurt? Why the incessant talk about babies? And do men secretly hate them? Caitlin Moran interweaves provocative observations on women's lives with laugh-out-loud funny scenes from her own, from the riot of adolescence to her development as a writer, wife, and mother. With rapier wit, Moran slices right to the truth--whether it's about the workplace, strip clubs, love, fat, abortion, popular entertainment, or childred--to jump-start a new conversation about feminism. With humor, insight, and verve, How To Be a Woman lays bare the reasons why female rights and empowerment are essential issues not only for women today but also for society itself.

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