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Classics and Imperialism in the British Empire (Classical Presences)

by Mark Bradley (Editor)

Other authors: Debbie Challis (Contributor), David Fearn (Contributor), Richard Hingley (Contributor), Abhishek Kaicker (Contributor), Margaret Malamud (Contributor)6 more, Rama Sundari Mantena (Contributor), Emma Reisz (Contributor), Adam Rogers (Contributor), Phiroze Vasunia (Contributor), Kostas Vlassopoulos (Contributor), Margaret Williamson (Contributor)

Series: Classical Presences

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While the study of Classics in postcolonial worlds has received a great deal of recent attention, this is the first comprehensive study of the relationship between classical ideas and British colonialism. In this collection of essays, classical scholars and modern historians demonstrate thatideas about the Greek and Roman world since the eighteenth century developed hand-in-hand with the rise and fall of the British Empire. Beginning with the history of the British Museum and its engagement both with classical antiquity and with the opportunities provided by the British Empire, thecontributors address the role of classical scholarship in understanding British colonization, the development of theories about race in Europe and beyond, the exploitation of individual classical texts as imperial discourses, ideas about imperial decline, and efforts to wrest ownership of theclassical past from the dominating control of the British.… (more)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Bradley, MarkEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Challis, DebbieContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fearn, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hingley, RichardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kaicker, AbhishekContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Malamud, MargaretContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mantena, Rama SundariContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Reisz, EmmaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rogers, AdamContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Vasunia, PhirozeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Vlassopoulos, KostasContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Williamson, MargaretContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

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While the study of Classics in postcolonial worlds has received a great deal of recent attention, this is the first comprehensive study of the relationship between classical ideas and British colonialism. In this collection of essays, classical scholars and modern historians demonstrate thatideas about the Greek and Roman world since the eighteenth century developed hand-in-hand with the rise and fall of the British Empire. Beginning with the history of the British Museum and its engagement both with classical antiquity and with the opportunities provided by the British Empire, thecontributors address the role of classical scholarship in understanding British colonization, the development of theories about race in Europe and beyond, the exploitation of individual classical texts as imperial discourses, ideas about imperial decline, and efforts to wrest ownership of theclassical past from the dominating control of the British.

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