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Broetry by Brian McGackin
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Broetry (original 2011; edition 2011)

by Brian McGackin

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488457,064 (3.23)1
As contemporary poets sing the glories of birds and birch trees, regular guys are left scratching their heads. Who can speak for Everyman? Who will articulate his love for Xbox 360, for Mama Celeste's frozen pizza, for the cinematic oeuvre of Bruce Willis?  Enter Broetry--a stunning debut from a dazzling new literary voice. "Broet Laureate" Brian McGackin goes where no poet has gone before--to Star Wars conventions, to frat parties, to video game tournaments, and beyond. With poems like "Ode to That Girl I Dated for, Like, Two Months Sophomore Year" and "My Friends Who Don't Have Student Loans," we follow the Bro from his high school graduation and college experience through a "quarter-life crisis" and beyond.… (more)
Member:writemeg
Title:Broetry
Authors:Brian McGackin
Info:Quirk Books (2011), Hardcover, 128 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:poetry, humor

Work Information

Broetry: Poetry for Dudes by Brian McGackin (2011)

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English (7)  French (1)  All languages (8)
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
I can see how this book is clever, and it's certainly an interesting idea (Broetry = poetry for dudes). But I could not keep reading a book that constantly refers to women as "bitches." Why do some guys think that if a girl breaks up with you she's automatically a bitch? Also I just can't relate to all the beer-centric poems.
  aratiel | Sep 5, 2018 |
If, say, I was the average college frat boy (I believe beer-binging, video gaming, girls, and sex go hand-in-hand with common frat-boy associations)—or even the 'common' dude or dudette—I might be more apt to relate to broetry. Or, in the very least, strangle my bro-bias long enough for it to temporarily check out, long enough for me to yank my brain out of snobville, and thus surrender what I appreciate about "regular poetry" (McGackin's phrase, not mine). I questioned if I am one of those people: people who have their heads shoved so deep in book pages and Fringe plot twists that when the time comes to socialize with society's norm, they emerge as awkward creatures who think the status bro-quo is far too idiotic and far less interesting than their natural habitat. Or, perhaps, I am a little too disapproving of the typical bro (I did admit to harboring a bias, okay).

Broetry is poetry that's right for you.
Broetry is a literary chili cheeseburger.

I know, but I don't like chili cheeseburgers—not even the literary kind. This has been a failed persuasion, McGackin, so go ahead: groan. What this boils down to, really, is that I am not part of the intended target audience. If this was instead titled, "I'm sorry I can't hang out this weekend, but I have a busy schedule of doing nothing by myself: poems for the common introvert loner" or "Poems about Picard, his Enterprise, & other things to make you nerdgasm," I might grow feelings of a deep, real love. I'd feel a connection between me and the book, but because I have little in common with Broetry's content... Well, the hook is there yet no bait to draw me in, put simply. However. Broetry is—even after all I have said, you best believe it—amusing.

To pull a few examples from the book directly:

and I might not be an adult per se,
but I'm sure I'll make it there someday.

Theoretically.
—Kids Today

You're only four years younger
than me, but at 2 a.m. when I'm online,
your website makes me feel like a creep
—Ode to Taylor Swift

1 weekend visiting your cousin's state school 1 girl
whose name you can't remember 1 one-night stand = 1
case of herpes
—College Love - Love = College

There are, of course, other parts that pried my lips into a smile, such as a few spotted references/parodies of other (serious) literary works, the notion of Patrick Stewart ruling the word (via Enterprise), Arizona tea, frozen pizza, how every region on planet Earth is a disaster zone so you best liken to the idea of dying ("unless you find a way to escape / to somewhere less deadly, though it's fairly / safe to assume you've got a good chance of / dying there, too"). I will not readily buy into that it's-so-dumb-it's-genius brouhaha, but Broetry may work for you when the need to read lighter material strikes.

Broetry is poetry that may (not) be right for you.
Broetry is a literary chili cheeseburger.
So: are you hungry? You won't know if you like it until you try it.

( )
  the_airtwit | May 19, 2013 |
Read on September 05, 2011

At times hilarious, other times sad...I never thought something called Broetry could be such good poetry. Loved it!

I highly recommend reading it aloud with friends...definitely worth sharing! You could even have a Broetry reading party... ( )
  melissarochelle | Apr 6, 2013 |
Why read: Received for review

What impressed me: I'm no poetry fan, but I could get through this book easily and managed to be mildly entertained for the most part.

What disappointed me: The novelty of McGackin's voice wears off about four poems in. If feels like it's supposed to be really funny, but completely misses the mark landing nearer unusual. Broetry proves poetry can be written for the masses, but it failed to strike a chord in me.

Recommended: Not really. It's only appeal is in its quirkiness. ( )
  TequilaReader | Jun 30, 2012 |
This book of poetry for "bros" is absolutely hilarious! McGackin uses true poetry-writing skills and techniques and applies them to popular topics among college-age guys. Naturally, there is plenty of material about sex, drinking, and being broke (isn't that what college is all about?), and he also pulls quite a lot of material from popular culture (superheroes, action movies, classical music, and World of Warcraft, just to name a few). The major social networking websites are all properly represented, as well.

Nowhere else will you find such entertaining poetry. McGackin's Broetry breathes life into the embers of the ebbing art of poetry, tailoring it to those coming-of-age in the 21st century. He writes about life as college-age kids see and experience it, throws in witticisms and just a dash of foul language, and there you have it- Broetry. I would recommend anyone read this as it's a welcome relief from the stuffy poetry of previous generations and is guaranteed to keep you laughing from beginning to end. I give it five out of five stars and look forward to future publications from Brian McGackin. ( )
  StephaniePetty | Dec 19, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
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This book is dedicated to Margaret Agnes Connelly, the most beautiful woman in the world.
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Over my head, I see worn ski equipment, / two cracked snowboards, and a black kayak / strung from wooden beams across the ceiling.
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As contemporary poets sing the glories of birds and birch trees, regular guys are left scratching their heads. Who can speak for Everyman? Who will articulate his love for Xbox 360, for Mama Celeste's frozen pizza, for the cinematic oeuvre of Bruce Willis?  Enter Broetry--a stunning debut from a dazzling new literary voice. "Broet Laureate" Brian McGackin goes where no poet has gone before--to Star Wars conventions, to frat parties, to video game tournaments, and beyond. With poems like "Ode to That Girl I Dated for, Like, Two Months Sophomore Year" and "My Friends Who Don't Have Student Loans," we follow the Bro from his high school graduation and college experience through a "quarter-life crisis" and beyond.

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