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The Fault in Our Stars (2012)

by John Green

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
27,2131548110 (4.21)710
Sixteen-year-old Hazel, a stage IV thyroid cancer patient, has accepted her terminal diagnosis until a chance meeting with a boy at cancer support group forces her to reexamine her perspective on love, loss, and life.
  1. 180
    Looking for Alaska by John Green (kaledrina)
  2. 101
    Every Day by David Levithan (brnoze)
    brnoze: This is a wonderful story with a great premise. A young adult who wakes up as a different person every 24 hours. The author drops into the lives of many different characters and we get to learn through the eyes of the main character A. This is a love story. a coming of age story and a fantasy of a very different kind. I really enjoyed it.… (more)
  3. 71
    The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time by Mark Haddon (Anonymous user)
  4. 50
    Love Story by Erich Segal (cransell)
  5. 50
    Paper Towns by John Green (StephReads, chwiggy)
  6. 40
    Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell (StefanieGeeks)
    StefanieGeeks: Both stories have witty teenagers who fall in love as they go through tough times together and contain excellent character development.
  7. 40
    Before I Die by Jenny Downham (kaledrina)
  8. 30
    Every You, Every Me by David Levithan (kaledrina)
  9. 41
    Going Bovine by Libba Bray (fyrefly98)
    fyrefly98: Both are about teenagers with a terminal disease, but both books manage to be incredibly funny, even when they're making you cry.
  10. 30
    The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky (tandah)
  11. 30
    This Star Won't Go Out: The Life and Words of Esther Grace Earl by Esther Earl (TomWaitsTables)
    TomWaitsTables: Don't forget to be awesome.
  12. 20
    Accidents of Nature by Harriet McBryde Johnson (SylviaC)
    SylviaC: Both books have the same dark humour, and contain strong messages about humanity and disability.
  13. 20
    Me and Earl and the Dying Girl by Jesse Andrews (chazzard)
  14. 10
    Turtles All the Way Down by John Green (chwiggy)
  15. 10
    Never Eighteen by Megan Bostic (kaledrina)
  16. 00
    Love Ya Like a Sister: A Story of Friendship by Julie Johnston (Cecilturtle)
  17. 11
    Tell the Wolves I'm Home by Carol Rifka Brunt (LottaBerling)
  18. 22
    Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green (sduff222)
  19. 00
    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Anonymous user)
  20. 23
    Me Before You by Jojo Moyes (bpompon)

(see all 22 recommendations)

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» See also 710 mentions

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Showing 1-5 of 1489 (next | show all)
Sigh. I wanted to like this book more. In fact, I loved the first half or so. Green has a wonderful way with words, and that is what carried me through to the end. The first half did not feel at all like the kind of book I was expecting. The characters, despite their situations, were interesting and kind and decidedly not weepy. The second half, however, was everything I feared it would be. The plot fell out from underneath me, becoming disappointingly predictable. The characters became selfish, mean, and tear-streaked. I really had hopes that this would turn into something unexpected, but it did not. ( )
  Library_Guard | Jun 17, 2024 |
{my thoughts} – This book was amazing. It was nothing short of amazing. Hazel is a teen girl that’s life is highly dependent on experimental drugs and an oxygen tank. Her mother and father worry she is too use to being home and is too depressed so they send her off to a support group for other teenagers in her situation. She attends this support group and meets Gus. Gus is the secondary character in this book and the two off them make for a beautiful story. I laughed, I teared up and I nearly cried. I don’t think anyone could honestly read this book and not like it!

The only thing I am not pleased about is that it doesn’t give any answers as to what becomes of Hazel at the end of the book. It sort of stops leaving you wonder the rest. Other then that I could read it over and over again and still enjoy it just as much as the first time I had read it! It was just that wonderful to me. I highly recommend this book. ( )
  Zapkode | Jun 1, 2024 |
{my thoughts} – This book was amazing. It was nothing short of amazing. Hazel is a teen girl that’s life is highly dependent on experimental drugs and an oxygen tank. Her mother and father worry she is too use to being home and is too depressed so they send her off to a support group for other teenagers in her situation. She attends this support group and meets Gus. Gus is the secondary character in this book and the two off them make for a beautiful story. I laughed, I teared up and I nearly cried. I don’t think anyone could honestly read this book and not like it!

The only thing I am not pleased about is that it doesn’t give any answers as to what becomes of Hazel at the end of the book. It sort of stops leaving you wonder the rest. Other then that I could read it over and over again and still enjoy it just as much as the first time I had read it! It was just that wonderful to me. I highly recommend this book. ( )
  CrimsonSoul | Jun 1, 2024 |
This is my first time doing a review like this. I'm breaking the book down into different areas and rating each one out of five stars.

POV: First person past tense. The narrator is Hazel Grace Lancaster, a terminally ill teenager.
Plot: **** It wasn't a mystery or anything but it didn't pretend to be. Straightforward but not boring.
Characters: ***^ (3.5) They were believable and reasonably interesting.
Style: **** John Green is a pleasure to read. I love that he makes us laugh out loud and sob just as hard. This man. There's not much place for foreshadowing (except the physical pain Augustus experienced when his body was made of cancer) or symbolism, but his writing it very effective.
Setting: **** Contemporary Indiana. Where else would you set a romance between cancer kids? Not bad.
Vocabulary: ***** Seriously. I felt like my mom should underline the words and make me look them up in the dictionary and copy the definitions into a notebook. Hamartia, anyone?
Appropriateness: ** Unfortunately, this book contains a lot of swearing. For some reason, swearing in narration bothers me far more than swearing in dialogue does. A character swearing adds depth to them. A narrator swearing makes it a foul book. G.d. and b.s. are used with great frequency. The f-word and p-word as well as other obscenities make a few appearances. In addition to issues with language, there is THE SCENE (Hazel and Augustus make love in a hotel room- not explicit but still worth mentioning) and other sexual references. Parents might want to preview this book before letting their kids read it.
Themes: ***** This story tells us that love can really, really hurt, but it's still worth it. This theme is also communicated clearly.
(A not on appropriateness and themes. For me, the themes came through stronger than the inappropriate material did, making it a good book for me to read. Others children and teens might not experience the same thing. It takes discretion.)
Overall enjoyment: **** Beautiful book. It made me laugh, it made me cry.
Quotability ***** "Pain demands to be felt" "Sometimes you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelicial zeal..." "You don't get to choose if you get hurt in this world...but you do have some say in who hurts you" and numerous other stand-alone gems hidden in the pages and paragraphs. ( )
  johanna.florez21 | May 27, 2024 |
Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verräter ♦ John Green | Rezension

Die Prosa ist so exquisit, dass sie fast ungerecht ist, und sie hat mir das Herz herausgerissen. Ich weinte, ich lächelte und ich klammerte mich an mein geschundenes Herz, welches immer wieder mitfühlend brach.



Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verräter ♦ John Green

Meinung

In Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verräter ist Hazel Lancaster, eine schwerkranke Sechzehnjährige mit Lungenkrebs im Endstadium, die Hauptfigur. Das Leben ist so schon herausfordernd genug, aber der Krebs hebt es auf eine ganz andere Stufe. Jeden Tag kämpft Hazel gegen ihr tragisches Schicksal an, bis sie auf Augustus Waters, eine weitere junge sterbende Seele, trifft. Plötzlich kann sich das Leben in den letzten Tagen und Stunden vor dem Tod überraschend zum Guten wenden.
Aber auch zum Schlechten.

Die meisten Bücher lese ich nicht nur mit den Augen, sondern auch mit dem Herzen. Oftmals geht das auch gut, aber manchmal ist es mit Risiken verbunden.
Ich hatte des Öfteren ein sehr mulmiges Gefühl im Magen, während ich durch die Seiten blätterte. Teils dachte ich, dass ich beim Lesen des unvorstellbar qualvollen Leidens selbst sterbe. Wahrscheinlich bin ich dies auch ein bisschen.
Trotz all der Qualen kommt Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verräter mit großartigen Momente daher – diese sind zwar rar, aber unglaublich intensiv – welche das Buch sehr, sehr lohnenswert machen.


Fazit

★★★★★

Das Schicksal ist ein mieser Verräter ist eine grausame Geschichte, die zweifellos fast alle LeserInnen in ständigen Tränen und mit einem hohen Taschentuchverbrauch zurücklassen wird.
Extrem berührend, oft sehr erhebend und motivierend, mit einem Anteil an humor- und liebevollen Momenten. Atemberaubend herzzerreißend. Es gibt so viele denkwürdige Zitate und Momente, die jeder für sich selbst entdecken sollte. Sehr empfehlenswert. Ein Meisterwerk für junge Erwachsene, aber auch jene darüber hinaus.


This review was first posted at The Art of Reading. ( )
  RoXXieSiXX | May 20, 2024 |
Showing 1-5 of 1489 (next | show all)

» Add other authors (38 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
John Greenprimary authorall editionscalculated
Corral, RodrigoCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rudd, KateNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vandervoort, IreneDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Zeitz, SophieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
As the tide washed in, the Dutch Tulip Man faced the ocean:
"Conjoiner rejoinder poisoner concealer revelator. Look at it,
rising up and rising down, taking everything with it."

"What's that?" I asked.

"Water," the Dutchman said. "Well, and time."

-PETER VAN HOUTEN, An Imperial Affliction
Dedication
To Esther Earl
First words
Late in the winter of my seventeenth year, my mother decided I was depressed.
Quotations
My favorite book, by a wide margin, was An Imperial Affliction, but I didn't like to tell people about it. Sometimes, you read a book and it fills you with this weird evangelical zeal, and you become convinced that the shattered world will never be put back together unless and until all living humans read the book. And then there are books like An Imperial Affliction, which you can't tell people about, books so special and rare and yours that advertising your affection feels like a betrayal.

It wasn't even that the book was so good or anything; it was just that the author, Peter Van Houten, seemed to understand me in weird and impossible ways. An Imperial Affliction was my book, in the way my body was my body and my thoughts were my thoughts.
There was time before organisms experienced consciousness, and there will be time after. And if the inevitability of human oblivion worries you, I encourage you to ignore it. Got knows that's what everyone else does.
You are buying into the cross-stitched sentiments of your parents' throw pillows. You're arguing that the fragile, rare thing is beautiful simply because it is fragile and rare. But that's a lie, and you know it.
What am I at war with? My cancer. And what is my cancer? My cancer is me. The tumors are made of me. They're made of me as surely as my brain and my heart are made of me. It is a civil war, Hazel Grace, with a predetermined winner.
There is no honor in dying of.
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Sixteen-year-old Hazel, a stage IV thyroid cancer patient, has accepted her terminal diagnosis until a chance meeting with a boy at cancer support group forces her to reexamine her perspective on love, loss, and life.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary
Cancer teens in love --

You might want to have a box

of tissues on hand.

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