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The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business (2012)

by Charles Duhigg

Other authors: See the other authors section.

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6,9792361,362 (3.89)89
Business. Psychology. Self-Improvement. Nonfiction. HTML:NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • This instant classic explores how we can change our lives by changing our habits.
NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Wall Street Journal • Financial Times
In The Power of Habit, award-winning business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Distilling vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives that take us from the boardrooms of Procter & Gamble to the sidelines of the NFL to the front lines of the civil rights movement, Duhigg presents a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential. At its core, The Power of Habit contains an exhilarating argument: The key to exercising regularly, losing weight, being more productive, and achieving success is understanding how habits work. As Duhigg shows, by harnessing this new science, we can transform our businesses, our communities, and our lives.
With a new Afterword by the author
 
“Sharp, provocative, and useful.”—Jim Collins
 
“Few [books] become essential manuals for business and living. The Power of Habit is an exception. Charles Duhigg not only explains how habits are formed but how to kick bad ones and hang on to the good.”Financial Times
 
“A flat-out great read.”—David Allen, bestselling author of Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

“You’ll never look at yourself, your organization, or your world quite the same way.”—Daniel H. Pink, bestselling author of Drive and A Whole New Mind

“Entertaining . . . enjoyable . . . fascinating . . . a serious look at the science of habit formation and change.”The New York Times Book Review
.
… (more)
  1. 00
    No Impact Man: The Adventures of a Guilty Liberal Who Attempts to Save the Planet and the Discoveries He Makes About Himself and Our Way of Life in the Process by Colin Beavan (mene)
    mene: In "The Power of Habit", it is described why people do things a certain way. The reason people buy so many things is also explained. "No Impact Man" is a good example of someone changing their habits (in a very extreme way). The author of "No Impact Man" also talks about why people buy so many things, among other things.… (more)
  2. 00
    Switch: How to Change Things When Change Is Hard by Chip Heath (Asumi)
  3. 00
    Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping by Paco Underhill (trav)
  4. 11
    How We Decide by Jonah Lehrer (Anonymous user)
  5. 00
    Mind Hacking: How to Change Your Mind for Good in 21 Days by Sir John Hargrave (nefitty)
  6. 00
    Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol S. Dweck (stephenkoplin)
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» See also 89 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 242 (next | show all)
I was intrigued by the title, which I somehow interpreted that maybe this would be a nifty read chock full of neuroscience, explaining why we do what we do in all that brainy good detail I enjoyed from other books, such as Buddha's Brain (why I interpreted it that way, I don't know; I'm just eager to read anything about psychology/neurosciences that becomes available at my library).... So, that said, I'm left disappointed, as this didn't match my expectations.

Also, I'm personally not a fan of the overall style of this book, e.g., the jumping back and forth between stories; nor am I fan of the author presenting a story as if he was there, a fly on the wall taking it in as it unfolds. But, kudos to the author for making/finding a correlation to habits in the different stories he tells, as I'd otherwise would not have made the connection. (Rosa Parks' story? Who knew? But I can't remember the correlation now.... Something more on a societal scale, but still it escapes me. And I'm not saying that flippantly, I honestly can't remember.)

Two to not-quite-three stars: two due to my personal tastes in writing-style, and almost making it to three because at least I learned something new (a better grasp of the history of the Montgomery Bus Strike).

( )
  metta | Jun 30, 2024 |
Earlier this year I saw Charles Duhigg was releasing Supercommunicators - How to Unlock the Secret Language of Connection. Keenly anticipating the pearls of wisdom within yet frustrated by the future dated release, I noticed he had an earlier title The Power of Habit - Why We Do What We Do, and How to Change.

Every now and again I feel ready for some self improvement and self help literature, so I decided to try The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg. I'm always hopeful I'll experience an 'a-ha' moment or discover a new insight that'll help me achieve my goals.

In retrospect, I should have just waited for Supercommunicators, but I had one particular habit I wanted to change by mid year and was optimistic this book might give me a new perspective or strategy to try. Instead Duhigg didn't offer this reader anything new.

There were plenty of examples of workplace habits and habits embedded in a range of companies and industries which I interpreted as mere company culture. Examples highlighted the benefits of changing individual habits for better practices across the workforce, but this just left me feeling like I'd read a business book on change management.

Listening to the audiobook, I also began to notice a repetition in the text read by the narrator that I might not have noticed in print; in fact I'm sure I wouldn't. When recounting pretty much anything - an anecdote from a worker or employee for instance - the author would say the person "told me". Well, I'd love to be able to count the number of times the author/narrator said "she/he/someone told me" because I'm sure it'd be impressive, but perhaps it's better I don't. Besides, it's time better spent reading anyway.

Ultimately The Power of Habit - Why We Do What We Do, and How to Change by Charles Duhigg didn't offer me any new insights into habits and behaviour, but perhaps that's not surprising given this isn't my first time reading a book about habits. Perhaps it's becoming a habit? (pun intended).

The Power of Habit - Why We Do What We Do, and How to Change by Charles Duhigg is a solid read recommended for readers new to the topic. ( )
  Carpe_Librum | May 2, 2024 |
I gleaned a lot of great information out of this book. Definitely going to have to let it digest and re-read at some point.

Everything from learning how habits are formed to how to use that to your advantage is packed in here. Another great section is all about how others are using your built-in habit loops against you. ( )
  teejayhanton | Mar 22, 2024 |
Right, THAT'S why I don't read generic business popsci self help books.
  caedocyon | Feb 23, 2024 |
Terrific book. I have a whole new outlook on coupons I get from Kroger and Target. ( )
  dhenn31 | Jan 24, 2024 |
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Charles Duhiggprimary authorall editionscalculated
Chamberlain, MikeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Thảo,Lêsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To Oliver, John Harry, John and Doris, and, everlastingly, to Liz.
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Business. Psychology. Self-Improvement. Nonfiction. HTML:NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • This instant classic explores how we can change our lives by changing our habits.
NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Wall Street Journal • Financial Times
In The Power of Habit, award-winning business reporter Charles Duhigg takes us to the thrilling edge of scientific discoveries that explain why habits exist and how they can be changed. Distilling vast amounts of information into engrossing narratives that take us from the boardrooms of Procter & Gamble to the sidelines of the NFL to the front lines of the civil rights movement, Duhigg presents a whole new understanding of human nature and its potential. At its core, The Power of Habit contains an exhilarating argument: The key to exercising regularly, losing weight, being more productive, and achieving success is understanding how habits work. As Duhigg shows, by harnessing this new science, we can transform our businesses, our communities, and our lives.
With a new Afterword by the author
 
“Sharp, provocative, and useful.”—Jim Collins
 
“Few [books] become essential manuals for business and living. The Power of Habit is an exception. Charles Duhigg not only explains how habits are formed but how to kick bad ones and hang on to the good.”Financial Times
 
“A flat-out great read.”—David Allen, bestselling author of Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity

“You’ll never look at yourself, your organization, or your world quite the same way.”—Daniel H. Pink, bestselling author of Drive and A Whole New Mind

“Entertaining . . . enjoyable . . . fascinating . . . a serious look at the science of habit formation and change.”The New York Times Book Review
.

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