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Enchanted

by Alethea Kontis

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Woodcutter Sisters (1), Books of Arilland (1)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
8176922,239 (3.84)33
It isn't easy being Sunday's child, not when you're the rather overlooked and unhappy youngest sibling to sisters named for the other six days of the week. Sunday's only comfort is writing stories, although what she writes has a terrible tendency to come true. When Sunday meets an enchanted frog who asks about her stories, the two become friends. Soon that friendship deepens into something magical. One night, Sunday kisses her frog goodbye and leaves, not realizing that her love has transformed him back into Rumbold, the crown prince of Arilland, and a man Sunday's family despises. The prince returns to his castle, intent on making Sunday fall in love with him as the man he is, not the frog he was. But Sunday is not so easy to woo. How can she feel such a strange, strong attraction to this prince she barely knows? And what twisted secrets lie hidden in his past, and hers?… (more)
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» See also 33 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 69 (next | show all)
Now here’s a fresh and excellent take on fairy tale shenanigans. Sunday Woodcutter, 7th daughter of a 7th daughter meets a frog at a fairy well and starts to tell a story… Wonderful weaving together of a whole host of tales in new and unexpected ways. Engrossing and lively. ( )
  jennybeast | Apr 14, 2022 |
This was a confusing, nonsensical read. In fact, if this book were a person, I'd probably diagnose it with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Clearly something prion-like was having a great time gnawing away on the characters, the plot, the backstory, entire essential scenes, the world-building...even the writing. (Though I did like the line, "They say that secrets live at the bottom of a wine bottle. Mama had made it there the night before, slow glass by slow glass[...]")

I finished this in hopes of finding some clarity. Instead, I got a vaguely sensible conclusion and an Acknowledgments filled with so much name-dropping, I started wondering if the author had written this entire book just so she could publish two pages' worth of cryptic references to Kim Jong-Il, John Scalzi, Orson Scott Card, Andre Norton, Sherrilyn Kenyon (and the boys), fancy editors who accepted her stories in other publications, the people of Cincinnati, and various workshops, writing clubs, contests, and random Starbucks. (All of which, clearly, anyone who is Anyone should know.) ( )
  slimikin | Mar 27, 2022 |
If I could, I'd give this book 2.5 of 5 stars- it was okay but I really don't think I can say that I liked it. Elements of it, I enjoyed. However, as much as I love fairy tale retellings, this one had too much going on. It almost seems as if the author was trying to cram as many fairy tale references as possible (with the same number of characters to boot), thus resulting in a jumble of plotlines. Unfortunately, I am less convinced of the instant-love scenarios as I once was, and it happens a couple of times here. This was an average book, but I'm afraid I have been spoiled by other fairy tale retellings from Juliet Marillier and Mercedes Lackey among others. ( )
  bookwyrmqueen | Oct 25, 2021 |
I loved how this booked weaved so many fairytales into something mostly comprehensible. However, there were some parts that were just plain confusing. ( )
  astronomist | Oct 3, 2021 |
I stayed up way past my bedtime finishing this. It was -- unexpectedly -- really well done. The pretty white girl in a pretty dress on the cover threw me, and I was expecting something very different. Thank you to that random person on Litsy who posted about this series with the note to ignore the covers.

This is a really fun fairy-tale inspired story. There are so many different stories that got referenced in some way in this book, and I loved it all. The plot was also delightful - it wasn't a simple straightforward plot, and had some twists and a greater scope that I really enjoyed.

I loved meeting the Woodcutters and look forward to more of their adventures. ( )
  wisemetis | Dec 7, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 69 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (1 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Alethea Kontisprimary authorall editionscalculated
Kellgren, KatherineNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Monday's child is fair of face,
Tuesday's child is full of grace,
Wednesday's child is full of woe,
Thursday's child has far to go,
Friday's child is loving and giving,
Saturday's child works hard for a living,
But the child who is born on the Sabbath Day
Is blithe and bonny and good and gay.
Dedication
For my father, who first read the fairy tales to me, for my mother, who told me to write a new one, and for my little sister, who was--and always will be--ungrateful.  May we all be doomed to a happy life.
First words
My name is Sunday Woodcutter, and I am doomed to a happy life.
Quotations
"There are four things that make a man fight as you just did," the duke explained to Rumbold.  "Love, despair, anger, or insanity."
Erik counted them off on his fingers.  "Everything to lose, nothing to lose, someone's taken it, or you've lost it."
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It isn't easy being Sunday's child, not when you're the rather overlooked and unhappy youngest sibling to sisters named for the other six days of the week. Sunday's only comfort is writing stories, although what she writes has a terrible tendency to come true. When Sunday meets an enchanted frog who asks about her stories, the two become friends. Soon that friendship deepens into something magical. One night, Sunday kisses her frog goodbye and leaves, not realizing that her love has transformed him back into Rumbold, the crown prince of Arilland, and a man Sunday's family despises. The prince returns to his castle, intent on making Sunday fall in love with him as the man he is, not the frog he was. But Sunday is not so easy to woo. How can she feel such a strange, strong attraction to this prince she barely knows? And what twisted secrets lie hidden in his past, and hers?

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Alethea Kontis is a LibraryThing Author, an author who lists their personal library on LibraryThing.

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Average: (3.84)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 11
2.5 1
3 49
3.5 12
4 79
4.5 13
5 41

 

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