HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Mamang (2011)

by Kim Scott

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
1111,434,508 (5)None
A brave young man travels the seas in the abdomen of a large whale ('mamang'). The man squeezes the heart of the whale and the old song he sings spurs the whale on to take him on a very special journey. The whale transports him far west of his home country, where his life is changed forever. *** Mamang - presented bilingually in English and Aboriginal Noongar language text - captures the deep spiritual connection of people with the sea. The book is inspired by an Aboriginal creation story that emphasizes the courage and confidence of the Noongar protagonist. It shows aspects of an Indigenous heritage and the long relationship of that culture with its natural environment from the south coast of Western Australia. The story was passed down orally for generations among the Noongar people. Around 1931, it was told to the American linguist Gerhardt Laves, who created the first written record of the story. Following Laves' death in the 1980s, his family discovered the documented story in its written form, which was then returned to the Noongar people. The book was developed as part of an Indigenous language recovery project led by author Kim Scott and the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project. The text has been carefully reworked by descendants of the original Noongar storytellers. Aboriginal artists have created beautiful and delightfully stunning illustrations to accompany the testimonial story.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Mamang is the folk tale of a Noongar (man) and a whale told in Noongar and English. Noongar is an endangered aboriginal language and this small children's book is the work of the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project. Kim Scott (That Deadman Dance)and Iris Woods are acknowledged as the main re-tellers of this old story.

Mamang is beautifully illustrated by Jeffrey Farmer,Helen Nelly and Roma Winmar, but the book's power is in its language, both in the joy of seeing/hearing Noongar used fluently (which I have not heard since childhood) and in the dynamic English translation.

I congratulate UWA Publishing for this delightful book. ( )
  TedWitham | Oct 20, 2011 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Datj wardarn-ak boyak-ngat ngoordiny. Mamang!
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

A brave young man travels the seas in the abdomen of a large whale ('mamang'). The man squeezes the heart of the whale and the old song he sings spurs the whale on to take him on a very special journey. The whale transports him far west of his home country, where his life is changed forever. *** Mamang - presented bilingually in English and Aboriginal Noongar language text - captures the deep spiritual connection of people with the sea. The book is inspired by an Aboriginal creation story that emphasizes the courage and confidence of the Noongar protagonist. It shows aspects of an Indigenous heritage and the long relationship of that culture with its natural environment from the south coast of Western Australia. The story was passed down orally for generations among the Noongar people. Around 1931, it was told to the American linguist Gerhardt Laves, who created the first written record of the story. Following Laves' death in the 1980s, his family discovered the documented story in its written form, which was then returned to the Noongar people. The book was developed as part of an Indigenous language recovery project led by author Kim Scott and the Wirlomin Noongar Language and Stories Project. The text has been carefully reworked by descendants of the original Noongar storytellers. Aboriginal artists have created beautiful and delightfully stunning illustrations to accompany the testimonial story.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (5)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5 2

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 164,486,689 books! | Top bar: Always visible