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Imagine: How Creativity Works (2012)

by Jonah Lehrer

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1,0095115,346 (3.57)20
"New York Times"-bestselling author Lehrer ("How We Decide") introduces readers to musicians, graphic artists, poets, and bartenders to show how they can use science to be more imaginative and make their cities, their companies, and their culture more creative.
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» See also 20 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
Discarded unread after finding when a friend pointed out the plagiarism scandal around the book and the conduct of the author. ( )
  brakketh | Jun 13, 2021 |
Fakery, schmakery, I learned a ton. ( )
  Smokler | Jan 3, 2021 |
A thought provoking and, above all, useful book on how to get creative and stay that way. The author has some interesting insights as to what works and what doesn't and it undermines a lot of the current conventional wisedom (brainstorming sessions, your days are numbered). He writes in a lively, conversational style that creates a clearity around the ideas. A valuable book! ( )
  Colleen5096 | Oct 29, 2020 |
Bob Dylan, William James, Chris Marzo, Jane Jacobs, Philip K. Dick, Milton Glaser, James Agee, David Byrne, Steve Jobs, Gary Gilmore, brainstorming, Pixar, the Barbie Doll, bourbon and bacon, Shakespeare, cities, bipolar disorder, Second City Improv, The Enlightenment, 3M, Alpha waves, amphetamines and Auden - Jonah Lehrer's Imagine is a torrential mash-up of far-flung subjects on the origin, nature and cognitive mechanisms that comprise the creative process. I liked it. You will too. I'll send you my copy if you want. ( )
  markflanagan | Jul 13, 2020 |
Maybe he was such a good popularizer (before his fall from grace) that a lot of the anecdotes seem acceptable to the point of obviousness when you read them. Or maybe things have been rearranged and reworked to such an extent that it any messy detail going against his thesis has been eliminated, it's hard to tell. I can't remember where and when this book had been recommended to me, a couple of years back, but I think it must have been prior to all the ruckus. It's a curiosity now, with a few interesting passages here and there. ( )
  rmagahiz | Jul 9, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 51 (next | show all)
The goal of “Imagine,” according to its subtitle, is to tell us “how creativity works” — to offer a scientific, mechanistic account of a seemingly ineffable phenomenon. And what distinguishes the scientific from other modes of thinking is not its technology, level of detail or even subject matter, but its ability to discover reliable cause-and-effect relationships. The clarity of physics and chemistry is rare in social science, but this is no license for presenting interesting speculations as settled truths.

The best way to think about “Imagine” is as a collection of interesting stories and studies to ponder and research further. Use it as a source of inspiration, but make your own careful choices about whether to believe what it says about the science of creativity.
 
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Hell is a place where nothing connects with nothing.
—T. S. Eliot, Introduction to Dante's Inferno
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For Sarah and Rose
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"New York Times"-bestselling author Lehrer ("How We Decide") introduces readers to musicians, graphic artists, poets, and bartenders to show how they can use science to be more imaginative and make their cities, their companies, and their culture more creative.

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Note: Jonah Lehrer [...] was discovered to have routinely recycled his earlier work, plagiarised press releases, and misused quotes and facts. His third book, Imagine: How Creativity Works (2012), was the starting point of scrutiny, when quotes attributed to Bob Dylan were discovered to be fabrications. Jonah Lehrer in Wikipedia
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Penguin Australia

An edition of this book was published by Penguin Australia.

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