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Tweeting the Universe: Tiny Explanations of…
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Tweeting the Universe: Tiny Explanations of Very Big Ideas

by Marcus Chown

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I know the blurb makes this book sound boring but it really isn't. In fact, it is chock full of fascinating facts about some very interesting topics. The authors have managed to explain the answers to very large questions in small easy-to-understand tweets, making this book an excellent choice for the layperson. It would also be great as a beginners guide for those interested in delving deeper into science of physics.

Overall, this is a book I would recommend to any reader with the least bit of interest in science, the universe or the world around us. ( )
  seldombites | Jan 21, 2013 |
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Two master science writers answer 140 of the biggest questions in physics, distilling the essence of each subject into tweets of 140 characters. Marcus Chown and Govert Schilling take us on a unique tour of the universe, covering everything, from the most basic question - 'Why is the sky dark at night?' and 'Why do stars twinkle?' - to the most challenging - 'What are quasars?' and 'What happened before the big bang?' .Some of the questions in this brilliantly informative book are as surprising as the answers. 'Is it possible that all the galaxies we see in our telescopes are nothing but an optical illusion?'. 'Could you swim on Saturn's moon, Titan?'. 'Why doesn't the Moon fall down?' (Not a stupid question, it turns out). And 'would Saturn float in a big enough bath of water?'… (more)

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