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The Cambridge History of Africa Volume 8: c. 1940 to c. 1975

by Michael Crowder (Editor)

Other authors: Adebayo Adedeji (Contributor), Lucy Creevey Behrn (Contributor), Christopher Clapham (Contributor), Basil Davidson (Contributor), Billy J. Dudley (Contributor)11 more, Ian Duffield (Contributor), Cherry Gertzel (Contributor), Bonar A. Gow (Contributor), Hans-Heino Kopietz (Contributor), Clement Henry Moore (Contributor), Ruth Schachter Morgenthau (Contributor), John Peel (Contributor), Pamela Ann Smith (Contributor), David Williams (Contributor), Francis Wilson (Contributor), M. Crawford Young (Contributor)

Series: The Cambridge History of Africa (8)

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The eighth and final volume of The Cambridge History of Africa covers the period 1940-75. It begins with a discussion of the role of the Second World War in the political decolonisation of Africa. Its terminal date of 1975 coincides with the retreat of Portugal, the last European colonial power in Africa, from its possessions and their accession to independence. The fifteen chapters which make up this volume examine on both a continental and regional scale the extent to which formal transfer of political power by the European colonial rulers also involved economic, social and cultural decolonisation. A major theme of the volume is the way the African successors to the colonial rulers dealt with their inheritance and how far they benefited particular economic groups and disadvantaged others. The contributors to this volume represent different disciplinary traditions and do not share a single theoretical perspective on the recent history of the continent, a subject that is still the occasion for passionate debate.… (more)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Crowder, MichaelEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Adedeji, AdebayoContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Behrn, Lucy CreeveyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Clapham, ChristopherContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Davidson, BasilContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dudley, Billy J.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Duffield, IanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gertzel, CherryContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gow, Bonar A.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kopietz, Hans-HeinoContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Moore, Clement HenryContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Morgenthau, Ruth SchachterContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Peel, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Smith, Pamela AnnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Williams, DavidContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wilson, FrancisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Young, M. CrawfordContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

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The eighth and final volume of The Cambridge History of Africa covers the period 1940-75. It begins with a discussion of the role of the Second World War in the political decolonisation of Africa. Its terminal date of 1975 coincides with the retreat of Portugal, the last European colonial power in Africa, from its possessions and their accession to independence. The fifteen chapters which make up this volume examine on both a continental and regional scale the extent to which formal transfer of political power by the European colonial rulers also involved economic, social and cultural decolonisation. A major theme of the volume is the way the African successors to the colonial rulers dealt with their inheritance and how far they benefited particular economic groups and disadvantaged others. The contributors to this volume represent different disciplinary traditions and do not share a single theoretical perspective on the recent history of the continent, a subject that is still the occasion for passionate debate.

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