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That hideous strength;: A modern fairy-tale…
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That hideous strength;: A modern fairy-tale for grownups (original 1945; edition 1965)

by C. S Lewis (Author)

Series: Space Trilogy (3)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
6,633741,023 (3.79)1 / 133
The final book in C.S. Lewis's acclaimed Space Trilogy, which includes Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra, That Hideous Strength concludes the adventures of the matchless Dr. Ransom. The dark forces that were repulsed in Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra are massed for an assault on the planet Earth itself. Word is on the wind that the mighty wizard Merlin has come back to the land of the living after many centuries, holding the key to ultimate power for that force which can find him and bend him to its will. A sinister technocratic organization is gaining power throughout Europe with a plan to "recondition" society, and it is up to Ransom and his friends to squelch this threat by applying age-old wisdom to a new universe dominated by science. The two groups struggle to a climactic resolution that brings the Space Trilogy to a magnificent, crashing close.… (more)
Member:Marytudor
Title:That hideous strength;: A modern fairy-tale for grownups
Authors:C. S Lewis (Author)
Info:Macmillan (1965), 382 pages
Collections:Your library
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That Hideous Strength by C. S. Lewis (Author) (1945)

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» See also 133 mentions

English (71)  Dutch (1)  Norwegian (1)  All languages (73)
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
1976 printing 1975 printing. ( )
  ME_Dictionary | Mar 19, 2020 |
O melhor da trilogia. ( )
  felipebarnabe | Mar 19, 2020 |
This book grows out of Lewis' "Abolition of Man" as another way to present the apathetic tendencies of us all to a culture that is evolving in ways evil or good without a thought or consideration for the consequences, eternal consequences, that continually lie before us. We make choices that affect more than we know. ( )
  hbuchana | Oct 5, 2019 |
This is a science fiction novel that deals with quite a few issues, some of which are more science, others of which are more fiction, and several of which are neither. It is set in a small, traditional, fictional university town, which has to adjust to the arrival of a new major scientific institute which aims to take over the whole country. The two main characters are Mark, who is a research fellow at one of the colleges of the university, and Jane who is his wife. They do not have a happy marriage, and end up on opposing sides in the battle between good and evil. It turns out to be a bit more complicated than the science=bad vs nature=good dualism though, as the institute turns out to be something more like a political institute operating under the guise of science, while secretly controlled by aliens. Alongside this, they plan to resurrect Merlin and use his powers to their advantage. On the other side, Jane joins an opposition group who come from various walks of life, and are led by a mysterious character who also has interplanetary involvement.

So what is it really about then? Partly it is making a point about freedom and oppression, about love and hate, and about the goodness of human nature against the will to power, humanism vs materialism. In feel it takes a bit of Kafka in the unfathomable bureaucratic and procedural corporate goings on, a bit of Orwell, a bit of sub-HG Wells science, a tiny bit of Tom Sharpe, and some traditional science fiction mixed with historical fantasy.

While there are a lot of reasons this book could be criticised, it also has a few things to recommend it. Lewis does make a good point here about the danger of mankind’s thirst for power, with quite realistic portrayal of some of the character types that can be found. There are some excellent sections of descriptive prose, and some acute political and social observation. Indeed, it pre-empts Orwell in some of his details in 1984, though of course this is not surprising as the mechanistics of oppression and political power-mongering have their universals.

In all, this was worth reading, but had many of the faults that typically put me off from reading science fiction – stretching of credulity, occasional cheesiness, and a few over blown clichés. However there is much more to this novel than that, and it certainly has its depths across several themes– religion, psychology, politics, love, science and nature. ( )
  P_S_Patrick | Jun 19, 2019 |
-- Novel is final in Space Trilogy. Action occurs on Earth's terra firma & novel is more traditional than #2 PERELANDRA (setting is Venus) & #1 OUT OF THE SILENT PLANET (Mars). Philologist Dr. Elwin Ransom returns as a protagonist & introduces Mark & Jane Studdock as well as other "characters." The National Institute of Coordinated Experiments buys Bracton College. -- ( )
  MinaIsham | Jan 29, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (15 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Lewis, C. S.Authorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Craft, KunikoCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kannosto, MattiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nielsen, CliffCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Powers, Richard M.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Symancyk, BernardCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
THE SHADOW OF THAT HYDDEOUS STRENGTH
SAX MYLE AND MORE IT IS OF LENGTH.
(Sir David Lyndsay: from Ane Dialog, describing the Tower of Babel)
Dedication
To J. McNeill
First words
"Matrimony was ordained, thirdly," said Jane Studdock to herself, "for the mutual society, help, and comfort that the one ought to have of the other."
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
The Tortured Planet is an abridged version of That Hideous Strength. Please do not combine them.
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Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Wikipedia in English (2)

The final book in C.S. Lewis's acclaimed Space Trilogy, which includes Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra, That Hideous Strength concludes the adventures of the matchless Dr. Ransom. The dark forces that were repulsed in Out of the Silent Planet and Perelandra are massed for an assault on the planet Earth itself. Word is on the wind that the mighty wizard Merlin has come back to the land of the living after many centuries, holding the key to ultimate power for that force which can find him and bend him to its will. A sinister technocratic organization is gaining power throughout Europe with a plan to "recondition" society, and it is up to Ransom and his friends to squelch this threat by applying age-old wisdom to a new universe dominated by science. The two groups struggle to a climactic resolution that brings the Space Trilogy to a magnificent, crashing close.

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