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The Big Sleep; and Farewell, My Lovely (1995)

by Raymond Chandler

Series: Philip Marlowe (Samlingsvolym 1-2)

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2234100,574 (4.34)5
These two classic novels featuring private eye Philip Marlowe made Raymond Chandler's name synonymous with America's hard-boiled school of crime fiction.  The Big Sleep was an instant success when first published in 1939.  It centers around a paralyzed California millionaire with two psychopathic daughters; he involves Marlowe in a case of blackmail that turns into murder. Farewell My Lovely, which Chandler regarded as his finest work, came out the following year.  It has Marlowe dealing with the Los Angeles gambling circuit, a murder he stumbles upon, and three very beautiful but potentially deadly women. "Chandler writes like a slumming angel and invests the sun-blinded streets of Los Angeles with a romantic presence," said Ross Macdonald.  And George V. Higgins wrote:  "Chandler is fun to read.  He's as bleak as tundra, and his dirtbag characters far outnumber his stellar citizens, but Philip Marlowe is a laconic tour guide through a zoo of truly interesting animals."… (more)
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» See also 5 mentions

English (3)  Catalan (1)  All languages (4)
Showing 3 of 3
The last time I had seen Dr. Cliff Harbour, we had spent time talking about the book I was writing as well as the book that he had written, John Dewey and the Future of Community College Education. During that visit, he insisted that I read The Big Sleep & Farewell, My Lovely by Raymond Chandler. In fact, he opened the book to the first page and had me read the first couple paragraphs. He wanted to point it out, and what I noted while reading the book, was that Raymond Chandler sparingly used his words. Yet, he was able to elicit an emotion. Read more
( )
  skrabut | Sep 2, 2020 |
Raymond Chandler has a very cynical, hard-boiled writing style which I love. He uses lots of metaphors and similes to describe his scenes and characters; thereby, making brief and yet thorough description. I love Raymond Chandler's work, it makes me feel like I'm there in that time and place. I also love Philip Marlowe, he is cynical, funny, smart-assed, and doesn't let beautiful women manipulate him. I recommend to all who like detective novels. ( )
  Joybee | Jun 7, 2011 |
I was a bit disappointed by the more famous "The Big Sleep;" despite the enjoyable writing style, it felt somehow lifeless. "Farewell, My Lovely" is significantly better.
  kvyar | Mar 24, 2007 |
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Philip Marlowe (Samlingsvolym 1-2)
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These two classic novels featuring private eye Philip Marlowe made Raymond Chandler's name synonymous with America's hard-boiled school of crime fiction.  The Big Sleep was an instant success when first published in 1939.  It centers around a paralyzed California millionaire with two psychopathic daughters; he involves Marlowe in a case of blackmail that turns into murder. Farewell My Lovely, which Chandler regarded as his finest work, came out the following year.  It has Marlowe dealing with the Los Angeles gambling circuit, a murder he stumbles upon, and three very beautiful but potentially deadly women. "Chandler writes like a slumming angel and invests the sun-blinded streets of Los Angeles with a romantic presence," said Ross Macdonald.  And George V. Higgins wrote:  "Chandler is fun to read.  He's as bleak as tundra, and his dirtbag characters far outnumber his stellar citizens, but Philip Marlowe is a laconic tour guide through a zoo of truly interesting animals."

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