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The Julian Jaynes Collection

by Marcel Kuijsten (Editor)

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Princeton University psychologist Julian Jaynes's revolutionary theory on the origin of consciousness or the "modern mind" remains as relevant and thought-provoking as when it was first proposed. Supported by recent discoveries in neuroscience, Jaynes's ideas force us to rethink conventional views of human history and psychology, and have profound implications for many aspects of modern life. Included in this volume are rare and never before seen articles, lectures, interviews, and in-depth discussions that both clear up misconceptions as well as extend Jaynes's theory into new areas such as the nature of the self, dreams, emotions, art, music, therapy, and the consequences and future of consciousness.**Expanded to include a new, previously unpublished wide-ranging 30-page interview with Julian Jaynes.**… (more)
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Praise for Julian Jaynes's Theory:

“… A theory that could alter our view of consciousness, revise our conception of the history of mankind, and lay bare the human dilemma in all its existential wonder.” — James E. Morriss, in ETC: A Review of General Semantics

“Some of Jaynes’s original ideas may be the most important of our generation.” — Ernest Rossi, in Psychological Perspectives

“Neuroimaging techniques of today have illuminated and confirmed the importance of Jaynes’s hypothesis.” — Robert Olin in Lancet ( )
  mkuijsten | Jan 27, 2021 |
Some of the articles are redundant with one another and with The Origin; this is unavoidable, though, due to the specific questions of Jaynes' work. The symposiums at the end, particularly those with Dennett, and Jaynes' own articles on the history of psychology are the most interesting sections of the book.I' m not sure I'd recommend the book to someone not familiar with the bicameral theory; The Origin itself would be the best starting point, but for those already interested in Jaynes it's a nice reference work. ( )
  xolotl | Aug 2, 2012 |
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Princeton University psychologist Julian Jaynes's revolutionary theory on the origin of consciousness or the "modern mind" remains as relevant and thought-provoking as when it was first proposed. Supported by recent discoveries in neuroscience, Jaynes's ideas force us to rethink conventional views of human history and psychology, and have profound implications for many aspects of modern life. Included in this volume are rare and never before seen articles, lectures, interviews, and in-depth discussions that both clear up misconceptions as well as extend Jaynes's theory into new areas such as the nature of the self, dreams, emotions, art, music, therapy, and the consequences and future of consciousness.**Expanded to include a new, previously unpublished wide-ranging 30-page interview with Julian Jaynes.**

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