HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Creole Belle: A Dave Robicheaux Novel by…
Loading...

Creole Belle: A Dave Robicheaux Novel (edition 2012)

by James Lee Burke

Series: Dave Robicheaux (19)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6062930,028 (4.01)19
While Dave Robicheaux was in a recovery unit in New Orleans, a mysterious woman named Tee Jolie Melton paid him a visit, giving him an iPod with the song 'Creole Belle' on it. Since then, Dave has become obsessed with the song and the woman who gave it to him. When he goes searching for her, he discovers that her sister has been murdered.… (more)
Member:Juarez_Santiago
Title:Creole Belle: A Dave Robicheaux Novel
Authors:James Lee Burke
Info:Simon & Schuster (2012), Edition: First Edition, Hardcover, 544 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Creole Belle by James Lee Burke

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 19 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
Recalling the first James Lee Burke I read, which was short stories, I can’t help thinking in his case that less is more. Has he gone the way of so many writers who seem to get to a point where they eschew an editor? I’m not sure why any book by Burke would need over 500 pages, but this one has almost no plot. Even if somebody had trimmed a hundred pages off it, it would still be a story cushioned in a lot more words than warranted. It is painfully repetitive, points that could have been made deftly once, hammered home time and time again. But it seems like an author gets to a point where nobody minds what he does any more. Reputation is everything. This book gets rave reviews which are not deserving.

Rest here:

https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2014/12/31/creole-belle-by-james-lee... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Recalling the first James Lee Burke I read, which was short stories, I can’t help thinking in his case that less is more. Has he gone the way of so many writers who seem to get to a point where they eschew an editor? I’m not sure why any book by Burke would need over 500 pages, but this one has almost no plot. Even if somebody had trimmed a hundred pages off it, it would still be a story cushioned in a lot more words than warranted. It is painfully repetitive, points that could have been made deftly once, hammered home time and time again. But it seems like an author gets to a point where nobody minds what he does any more. Reputation is everything. This book gets rave reviews which are not deserving.

Rest here:

https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2014/12/31/creole-belle-by-james-lee... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
Recalling the first James Lee Burke I read, which was short stories, I can’t help thinking in his case that less is more. Has he gone the way of so many writers who seem to get to a point where they eschew an editor? I’m not sure why any book by Burke would need over 500 pages, but this one has almost no plot. Even if somebody had trimmed a hundred pages off it, it would still be a story cushioned in a lot more words than warranted. It is painfully repetitive, points that could have been made deftly once, hammered home time and time again. But it seems like an author gets to a point where nobody minds what he does any more. Reputation is everything. This book gets rave reviews which are not deserving.

Rest here:

https://alittleteaalittlechat.wordpress.com/2014/12/31/creole-belle-by-james-lee... ( )
  bringbackbooks | Jun 16, 2020 |
It took me much too long to get through this one, and I can't say it was really worth the time I spent. Burke's mastery of language is still very evident here, in his exquisite descriptions of landscape, wildlife, weather phenomenon, and all sorts of natural beauty. Unfortunately he is just as skillful at describing what knives, bullets and weighted saps do to the human body, and there is just too much of that kind of thing in Creole Belle. Burke has always used violence to illustrate the evil side of human nature; even his protagonists could never be described as peace-loving. But since Hurricane Katrina and more recently the oil rig blow-out in the Gulf of Mexico, Burke has given us less and less of the beauty and more of the ugliness. I assume he is representing what he sees happening to his beloved Louisiana lowlands, but he has lost his feel for story and humanity, although he continues to pay lip service to the latter. There is damned little actual story here---the evildoers are evil indeed, but what they are up to (beyond killing and maiming) is awfully vague. It's something to do with why that oil rig blew up and poisoned the Gulf waters, ruined the oyster beds and crippled the shrimping industry, but Burke never bothers to explain it much beyond that. I'm tired of hearing about what a "good man" Clete Purcel is. You know better than that, Mr. Burke---you can't ask us to believe it just because his best friend says so, you have to show us that it's true. After 19 books, I'm still trying to "get" Purcel. A good man can have bad impulses, but he finds the strength to resist them, at least some of the time. Clete never does. I'm tired of Burke treating his female characters as dispensable, unless it suits him to have Robicheaux rescue them from dire circumstances. I'm tired of finding no one to admire in his books. Maybe I'm getting old and cranky. Maybe I've just read too much. Or maybe Burke should have let Dave and Clete die in that mythic moment at the end of The Glass Rainbow. It's almost impossible to suspend my disbelief any more about just how much brutal insult their aging bodies can take and recover from, let alone the superhuman feats they perform with bullets in their backs. My daughter has suggested that I go back and read one of Burke's earlier novels in the series, one that I particularly enjoyed, to get the bad taste out of my mouth. That may be a good idea. But I'll have to wait a while.
April 2013 ( )
2 vote laytonwoman3rd | Sep 17, 2017 |
This is the darkest of the Dave Robicheaux novels, at least up to the time of its publication in 2012, written by James Lee Burke. Once again, Detective Robicheaux of the Iberia Parish Sheriff's Department and his best friend and fellow warrior against injustice Clete Purcell survive a horrendously violent battle against the forces of crime and depravity in the bayou country of southern Louisiana, but they are both badly wounded, physically and spiritually, in the fight.

Dave and Clete, both Vietnam War vets, are now facing constant reminders of their own mortality. In this tale, they also have to worry about their independent-minded adult daughters while trying to deal with a malignant family of power and wealth involved in the BP oil rig explosion and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. ( )
  ChuckNorton | Nov 1, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

Belongs to Series

You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Information from the Russian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Epigraph
Dedication
In memory of Michael Pinkston, Martha Hall, and David Thompson
First words
For the rest of the world, the season was still fall, marked by cool nights and the gold-green remnants of summer.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

While Dave Robicheaux was in a recovery unit in New Orleans, a mysterious woman named Tee Jolie Melton paid him a visit, giving him an iPod with the song 'Creole Belle' on it. Since then, Dave has become obsessed with the song and the woman who gave it to him. When he goes searching for her, he discovers that her sister has been murdered.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Languishing in a recovery unit on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans, Dave Robicheaux is fighting an enemy more insidious than the one who put a bullet in his back a month earlier in a shootout on Bayou Teche. The morphine meant to dull his pain is steadily gnawing away at his resolve, playing tricks on his mind, and luring him back into the addict mentality that once threatened to destroy his life and family.

With the soporific Indian summer air wafting through the louvered shutters of his hospital room, and the demons fighting for space in his head, Dave can't be sure whether his latest visitor is flesh and blood or a spectral reminder of his Louisiana youth. Tee Jolie Melton, a young woman with a troubled past, glides to his bedside and leaves him with an iPod that plays the old country blues song "My Creole Belle".

What Dave doesn't know is that Tee Jolie disappeared weeks ago, and no one believes she reappeared to comfort an old man with a bullet wound. Dave becomes obsessed with the song and the vivid memory of Tee Jolie, and when he learns that her sister has turned up dead inside a block of ice floating in the Gulf, he believes that putting the evils of the past to rest is more urgent than ever before.

Meanwhile, an oil spill in the Gulf brings back intense feelings for Dave of losing his father to a rig explosion years ago. As the oil companies continue to risk human lives in pursuit of wealth and power, Dave begins to see links to the Melton sisters, even when no one else shares his suspicions. Dave's ex-partner Clete Purcel helps him search for Tee Jolie, though Clete fears for his friend's mental health and safety. But Clete has his own troubles, too; he's discovered an illegitimate daughter who may be working as a contract killer - and may have set her sights on someone he loves.

"Creole Belle" is a resurrection story for the ages, with James Lee Burke at the peak of his masterful career and Dave Robicheaux facing his most intense and personal battle yet, against the known and unknown forces that corrupt and destroy even the best of men.
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.01)
0.5
1 2
1.5 1
2 3
2.5 2
3 19
3.5 8
4 61
4.5 11
5 37

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

» Publisher information page

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 163,192,145 books! | Top bar: Always visible