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You Can Get Arrested for That: 2 Guys, 25…
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You Can Get Arrested for That: 2 Guys, 25 Dumb Laws, 1 Absurd American… (edition 2006)

by Rich Smith (Author)

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15110158,889 (2.86)6
What started out as an innocent board game inspired Rich Smith to undertake a daring crime spree across the United States - a journey to break the dumbest American laws on the statute books. In the Land of the Free, it is illegal to- - Lie down and fall asleep in a cheese factory (South Dakota) - Play a trumpet with the intention of luring someone to a store (California) - Catch a fish with a lasso (Tennessee) Rich's first problem was narrowing down the huge choice of laws to just twenty-five. The second was persuading his mate Bateman to come along, to do some of the driving - and possibly provide bail money. The third was finding someone who was willing to help him break his first law- one of San Francisco's oldest statutes, which related to oral sex. No, Bateman couldn't help with that one. Join Rich as he attempts his one-man crime wave - almost as difficult as a one-man Mexican wave.… (more)
Member:hkaur1003
Title:You Can Get Arrested for That: 2 Guys, 25 Dumb Laws, 1 Absurd American Crime Spree
Authors:Rich Smith (Author)
Info:Three Rivers Press (2006), Edition: First Edition, 256 pages
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You Can Get Arrested for That: 2 Guys, 25 Dumb Laws, 1 Absurd American Crime Spree by Rich Smith

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Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
A somewhat difficult read due to its authors ill-conceived writing style. The book is at times tedious, at times entertaining. I'd recommend it, but with some reserve as all in all it wasn't that wonderful. For a better read, just use Snopes. ( )
  Lepophagus | Jun 14, 2018 |
Wish there was less talk about their vacation, their nights out drinking and the landmarks they saw (although I probably found it boring because I've seen most of them, and the book was originally published in G.B. - so exciting for Europeans maybe) and more about the actual laws they broke. Additionally, Smith even admits that some of the laws may not actually be "real" - he relies on a published book for the laws rather than the actual legal text. But still, trying to find a kite to fly in Washington DC (and ending up making one from stuff bought at WalMart) because it's illegal to fly anything in the airspace there was pretty funny. ( )
  elle-kay | Jan 27, 2016 |
Not enough mayhem. ( )
  paperloverevolution | Mar 30, 2013 |
During a Christmas holiday with his family, Cornish journalist Rich Smith was playing a trivia game and asked the question “What is illegal for a divorced woman to do in Florida on Sundays?” The answer, to everyone’s astonishment was: parachuting. After that, he wanted to find out what other silly acts were illegal in the US. Once the plan was in mind, he hoodwinked his buddy Bateman into driving him around for the summer and the race was on.

As for the writing and the attitude, it’s a little disjointed. The writing’s fun and quick, but Smith and Bateman are easily discouraged at times. It seems at times just to be a vacation where they drink a lot and just happen to break some laws in the meantime. There’s a sense of laziness that pervades the excursion. For instance, with just a little bit of planning they could have easily notched a few more victories. Also, many of the laws aren’t explained very well. But, if you’ve got a free afternoon, this will pass the time pretty well as a combination travelogue/bar story.

http://lifelongdewey.wordpress.com/2012/12/08/349-you-can-get-arrested-for-that-... ( )
  NielsenGW | Dec 8, 2012 |
Who would have thought that a simple round of Balderdash would lead to one of the strangest crime sprees in America? But that's exactly what happened according to British writer Rich Smith in his book "You Can Get Arrested for That: 2 Guys, 25 Dumb Laws, 1 Absurd American Crime Spree". After a rousing game on Christmas Day in 2004, Smith was helping to put the game away when he spied a question on one of the cards and asked everyone "what activity was illegal for divorced women in Florida to do on Sundays". The answer -- skydiving -- made no sense to Smith, but it did pique his interest, challenging him to uncover other bizarre laws in the United States. His researched produced a surprising amount of such laws, and he wondered if he could get away with breaking them.

Months later, and with much British media attention, Smith and his buddy Bateman set out from England to the United States with the goal of breaking as many of the laws as they could. They began in San Francisco and drove their way East, through the Mojave Desert, crossing the Mississippi, and winding their way to New York, breaking -- or attempting to break -- as many laws as they could. Laws such as: it's illegal to peel an orange in a motel room in California; you can't play cards on the street with a Native American in Globe, Arizona; you can't fish while wearing pajamas in Chicago, Illinois; it's illegal to drive around the town square more than 100 times in a single session in Oxford, Mississippi.

Along the way they meet an interesting cast of characters, from a fortune teller in Long Beach, California, to Arden Deloris the Native American with whom they played cards in Arizona, and the residents of Mineral Point, Wisconsin -- the sister city to Smith and Bateman's hometown of Redruth. And that's where I think this book shines -- giving an outsider's glimpse at life in America thanks to the everyday people you meet on the street. People are friendlier and more willing to help than we give them credit for, and much of this travelog points that out.

I would have made an even more interesting story if Smith had been able to incorporate some history about the laws themselves, why a law banning someone from riding a bicycle in a pool in Baldwin Park or falling asleep in a cheese factory in South Dakota was necessary. Perhaps that's for another book? ( )
  ocgreg34 | Jan 10, 2012 |
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What started out as an innocent board game inspired Rich Smith to undertake a daring crime spree across the United States - a journey to break the dumbest American laws on the statute books. In the Land of the Free, it is illegal to- - Lie down and fall asleep in a cheese factory (South Dakota) - Play a trumpet with the intention of luring someone to a store (California) - Catch a fish with a lasso (Tennessee) Rich's first problem was narrowing down the huge choice of laws to just twenty-five. The second was persuading his mate Bateman to come along, to do some of the driving - and possibly provide bail money. The third was finding someone who was willing to help him break his first law- one of San Francisco's oldest statutes, which related to oral sex. No, Bateman couldn't help with that one. Join Rich as he attempts his one-man crime wave - almost as difficult as a one-man Mexican wave.

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