HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Happy Holidays! The 12 Days of LT scavenger hunt is going on. Can you solve the clues?
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Exemplary Tales of Love and Tales of…
Loading...

Exemplary Tales of Love and Tales of Disillusion

by Maria de Zayas y Sotomayor

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
1031,250,729 (4)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 3 of 3
This was much better than I thought it was going to be considering it was the first book I had to read for university. I also have never read any Spanish literature before. I loved the style of writing that allowed for the ballads that expressed deeper emotions. I also loved the way the book was a festival with the stories being part of that festival. Like a story inside a story inside another story. It was a great way to set up a collection of short stories.
The second half of the book "Tales of Disillusion" was a lot darker than the first half "Tales of Love" where the stories had relatively happy endings. Especially 'Forewarned but Fooled' which was just plain witty and I've recounted it to a few friends and we've laughed over it. The 'Fifth Tale of Disillusion' was my favourite out of the selected tales in the second half because of the graphic description of Dona Ines after six years. It painfully describes the torments she experienced even though she was an innocent women.
The writing was beautiful and even though it took me longer than other books I throughly enjoyed it. After reading the descriptions of the other 'Tales of Disillusion" in the footnotes towards the end of the book, I kinda wish I could've read all of them. ( )
  ebethiepaige | Oct 20, 2015 |
This was much better than I thought it was going to be considering it was the first book I had to read for university. I also have never read any Spanish literature before. I loved the style of writing that allowed for the ballads that expressed deeper emotions. I also loved the way the book was a festival with the stories being part of that festival. Like a story inside a story inside another story. It was a great way to set up a collection of short stories.
The second half of the book "Tales of Disillusion" was a lot darker than the first half "Tales of Love" where the stories had relatively happy endings. Especially 'Forewarned but Fooled' which was just plain witty and I've recounted it to a few friends and we've laughed over it. The 'Fifth Tale of Disillusion' was my favourite out of the selected tales in the second half because of the graphic description of Dona Ines after six years. It painfully describes the torments she experienced even though she was an innocent women.
The writing was beautiful and even though it took me longer than other books I throughly enjoyed it. After reading the descriptions of the other 'Tales of Disillusion" in the footnotes towards the end of the book, I kinda wish I could've read all of them. ( )
  ebethiepaige | Oct 20, 2015 |
This was much better than I thought it was going to be considering it was the first book I had to read for university. I also have never read any Spanish literature before. I loved the style of writing that allowed for the ballads that expressed deeper emotions. I also loved the way the book was a festival with the stories being part of that festival. Like a story inside a story inside another story. It was a great way to set up a collection of short stories.
The second half of the book "Tales of Disillusion" was a lot darker than the first half "Tales of Love" where the stories had relatively happy endings. Especially 'Forewarned but Fooled' which was just plain witty and I've recounted it to a few friends and we've laughed over it. The 'Fifth Tale of Disillusion' was my favourite out of the selected tales in the second half because of the graphic description of Dona Ines after six years. It painfully describes the torments she experienced even though she was an innocent women.
The writing was beautiful and even though it took me longer than other books I throughly enjoyed it. After reading the descriptions of the other 'Tales of Disillusion" in the footnotes towards the end of the book, I kinda wish I could've read all of them. ( )
1 vote bethie-paige | Jan 29, 2014 |
Showing 3 of 3
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Maria de Zayas y Sotomayorprimary authorall editionscalculated
Greer, Margaret RichTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rhodes, ElizabethTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0226768651, Paperback)

At the height of María de Zayas’s popularity in the mid-eighteenth century, the number of editions in print of her work was exceeded only by the novels of Cervantes.  But by the end of the nineteenth century, Zayas had been excluded from the Spanish literary canon because of her gender and the sociopolitical changes that swept Spain and Europe. Exemplary Tales of Love and Tales of Disillusion gathers a representative sample of seven stories, which features Zayas’s signature topics—gender equality and domestic violence—written in an impassioned tone overlaid with conservative Counter-Reformation ideology. This edition updates the scholarship since the most recent English translations, with a new introduction to Zayas’s entire body of stories, and restores Zayas’s author’s note and prologue, omitted from previous English-language editions. Tracing her slow but steady progress from notions of ideal love to love’s treachery, Exemplary Tales of Love and Tales of Disillusion will restore Zayas to her rightful place in modern letters.
 
 
 
 

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:15 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

At the height of Mar?a de Zayas?s popularity in the mid-eighteenth century, the number of editions in print of her work was exceeded only by the novels of Cervantes. But by the end of the nineteenth century, Zayas had been excluded from the Spanish literary canon because of her gender and the sociopolitical changes that swept Spain and Europe. Exemplary Tales of Love and Tales of Disillusion gathers a representative sample of seven stories, which features Zayas?s signature topics?gender equality and domestic violence?written in an impassioned tone overlaid with conservative Counter-Reformation ideology. This edition updates the scholarship since the most recent English translations, with a new introduction to Zayas?s entire body of stories, and restores Zayas?s author?s note and prologue, omitted from previous English-language editions. Tracing her slow but steady progress from notions of ideal love to love?s treachery, Exemplary Tales of Love and Tales of Disillusion will restore Zayas to her rightful place in modern letters.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 2
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 130,844,783 books! | Top bar: Always visible