HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Rounding the Mark (The Inspector Montalbano…
Loading...

Rounding the Mark (The Inspector Montalbano Mysteries Book 7) (original 2003; edition 2006)

by Andrea Camilleri (Author), Stephen Sartarelli (Translator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,0943613,163 (3.82)95
While swimming along the Sicilian shore, Inspector Montalbano discovers a corpse. His pursuit of the cause of death intersects with the inquiry into a hit-and-run accident that claimed the life of a young boy who may have been victimized by human traffickers. The buying and selling of immigrant children, for slave labor, sex, and as a source of illegal organ transplants, is part of the evil underside of the opening of Europe's borders. That, combined with frustration with his department's repressive handling of security for the G-8 summit in Genoa and the corruption among his superiors and the politicians behind them, makes setting anything right seem like an exercise in futility. Montalbano alternates between despair and steely resolve. When he realizes that he may have inadvertently aided the boy's victimizers, his internal turmoil intensifies.… (more)
Member:barlow304
Title:Rounding the Mark (The Inspector Montalbano Mysteries Book 7)
Authors:Andrea Camilleri (Author)
Other authors:Stephen Sartarelli (Translator)
Info:Penguin Books (2006), 274 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Mystery

Work details

Rounding the Mark by Andrea Camilleri (2003)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 95 mentions

English (29)  Spanish (4)  German (2)  Dutch (1)  All languages (36)
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
Yet again, Andrea Camilleri hits the bullseye with Inspector Montalbano. In this case, poor Montalbano is down in the dumps, determined to resign as he no longer respects the Italian justice system. But chance encounters draw him into two mysteries: a body floating off his beloved beach and a small refugee boy who wants to run away.

Featuring his trademark humor, Camilleri weaves these two strands together as Montalbano's sense of justice sweeps away his doldrums. As usual, the book is full of humor from the way Catarella mangles logic, language and names to Montalbano's obsession with a really good lunch. Although I cannot read Cavalleri in the original (too much dialect), Stephen Sartarelli's translation captures both the humor and the horror of the situations Montalbano finds himself in.

Want to escape the pandemic? Go to beautiful Sicily with Camilleri and his Inspector Montalbano. ( )
  barlow304 | Oct 17, 2020 |
Another great Montalbano. Wonderful narrator. Great story. Love the twists and turns. Love the humor. Well done! ( )
  njcur | Jun 18, 2020 |
Beim Schwimmen im Meer kollidiert Commissario Montalbano mit einer Leiche. Wie sich herausstellt, ist der Ertrunkene nur einer von vielen Menschen - illegalen Einwanderern, die von Schleppern nachts auf Booten abgesetzt werden-, die das Meer an die sizilianische Küste spült. Als Montalbano Nachforschungen anstellt, nimmt eine Tragödie gewaltigen Ausmaßes Gestalt an, die schließlich in dunkler Tiefe zu einem unvergesslichen Ort des Verbrechens führt.
  Fredo68 | May 14, 2020 |
This may be my least favorite in the Montalbano series to date. Inspector Montalbano discovers a corpse while swimming. It ends up being about a small boy Montalbano encounters who is later murdered. He investigates on the side without authorization and without letting his superiors or his team know what he's up to. In fact, Fazio comes across as a more competent detective than Montalbano in many ways for without him and Mimi, there would not have been a next installment in the series. Grover Gardner's narration was excellent, as usual, but the ending of this one felt a bit abrupt as I listened. ( )
1 vote thornton37814 | Mar 1, 2020 |
I don't enjoy having to worry about Inspector Montalbano's health, and the mystery element was too diffuse and dependent on co-incidence to be as convincing as it was heartbreaking. ( )
  quondame | Sep 5, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 29 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Andrea Camilleriprimary authorall editionscalculated
Sartarelli, StephenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Belongs to Series

Belongs to Publisher Series

BLT (92193)
SaPo (456)
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Stinking, treacherous night.
Nuttata fitusa,’nfami, tutta un arramazzarsi, un votati e rivotati, un addrummisciti e un arrisbigliati, un susiti e un curcati.
Quotations
[...] la sira avanti aviva avuto lo stomaco accussì stritto che non ci sarebbe passato manco un filo d’erba. Si era trattato dei pinsèri nìvuri che l’avevano assugliato doppo avere sentito una notizia del telegiornale nazionale. «All’annigatu, petri di ’ncoddru» era il detto popolare che veniva esclamato quando una insopportabile serie di disgrazie s’abbatteva su qualche sbinturato. E per lui, che già da qualche mese nuotava alla disperata in mezzo a un mare in timpesta, e si sentiva a tratti perso come un annegato, quella notizia era stata uguale a una vera e propria pitrata tiratagli addosso, anzi una pitrata che l’aviva pigliato preciso ’n testa, tramortendolo e facendogli perdere le ultime, debolissime forze.
Con un’ariata assolutamente indifferente, la giornalista del tg aveva detto che la procura di Genova, in merito all’irruzione della polizia alla scuola Diaz nel corso del G8, si era fatta pirsuasa che le due bombe molotov, trovate nella scuola, erano state portate lì dagli stessi poliziotti per giustificare l’irruzione. Questo faceva seguito – aveva continuato la giornalista – alla scoperta che l’agente il quale aveva dichiarato di essere stato vittima di un tentativo di accoltellamento da parte di un no-global, sempre nel corso di quell’irruzione, aveva in realtà mentito: il taglio alla divisa se l’era fatto lui stesso per dimostrare la pericolosità di quei ragazzi che invece, a quanto si andava via via svelando, nella scuola Diaz stavano pacificamente dormendo. Ascutata la notizia, per una mezzorata Montalbano era restato assittato sulla poltrona davanti al televisore, privo della capacità di pinsari, scosso da un misto di raggia e di vrigogna, assammarato di sudore. Non aveva manco trovato la forza di susirisi per rispondere al telefono che stette a squillare a longo. Bastava ragionare tanticchia supra quelle notizie che venivano date col contagocce e con governativa osservanza dalla stampa e dalla televisione per farsi preciso concetto: i suoi compagni e colleghi, a Genova, avevano compiuto un illegale atto di violenza alla scordatina, una specie di vendetta fatta a friddo e per di più fabbricando prove false. Cose che facevano tornare a mente episodi seppelluti della polizia fascista o di quella di Scelba.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

While swimming along the Sicilian shore, Inspector Montalbano discovers a corpse. His pursuit of the cause of death intersects with the inquiry into a hit-and-run accident that claimed the life of a young boy who may have been victimized by human traffickers. The buying and selling of immigrant children, for slave labor, sex, and as a source of illegal organ transplants, is part of the evil underside of the opening of Europe's borders. That, combined with frustration with his department's repressive handling of security for the G-8 summit in Genoa and the corruption among his superiors and the politicians behind them, makes setting anything right seem like an exercise in futility. Montalbano alternates between despair and steely resolve. When he realizes that he may have inadvertently aided the boy's victimizers, his internal turmoil intensifies.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.82)
0.5
1 1
1.5 3
2 5
2.5 6
3 48
3.5 27
4 92
4.5 15
5 41

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,691,571 books! | Top bar: Always visible