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The Explicit Gospel (2012)

by Matt Chandler

Other authors: Jared Wilson, Jared Wilson

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1,4921212,283 (4.02)1
Too few people attending church today, even those in evangelical churches, are exposed to the gospel explicitly. Sure, many will hear about Jesus, and about being good and avoiding bad, but the gospel message simply isn't there--at least not in its specificity and its fullness. Inspired by the needs of both the overchurched and the unchurched, and bolstered by the common neglect of the explicit gospel within Christianity, Matt Chandler has written this punchy treatise. He begins with the specifics of the gospel--outlining what it is and what it is not--and then switches gears to focus on the fullness of the gospel and its massive implications on both personal and cosmic levels. Recognizing our tendency to fixate on either the micro or macro aspects of the gospel, Chandler also warns us of the dangers on either side--of becoming overly individualistic or syncretistic. Here is a call to true Christianity, to know the gospel explicitly, and to unite the church on the amazing grounds of the good news of Jesus!.… (more)
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The content of this book is good, and he does a nice job of covering the gospel and its implications from the perspective of individual salvation and redemptive history. The biggest negative of this book is that in the process of converting sermons to book form, a lot of the side-bars, light comments, and other features that make Chandler's sermons so engaging had the effect of being distracting and slightly annoying in book form. The other critique would be that when he goes on the offensive against opposing views, he is not charitable and thorough enough in his research. Those issues aside, there is much helpful material in here. ( )
  jmd862000 | Mar 28, 2023 |
As a general rule, I tend to not like most of what I read by Calvinists. There are a few exceptions that I have found to be helpful and useful: D.A. Carson, Timothy Keller, and Steve Brown. I may have to add Matt Chandler to that list. He hits so very many things just exactly right in this book that I can easily forgive the few things I quibble with. He gets that the gospel isn't just asking Jesus into your heart. The Gospel is the story of God's encounters and interactions with man and is best expressed not as a simple occurrence in a believer's life, but as God made flesh in the life of Jesus with a plan for man that precedes the beginning of time and lasts far past the end of time. Well done, Matt Chandler. ( )
  JohnKaess | Jul 23, 2020 |
Chandler has a no pulled punches, non diplomatic style that I appreciated - reminded me of Martin Luther. He is telling the Gospel as it is and fearlessly identifing and arguing against teachings that undermine the gospel. He calls the evangelical church to refocus on the essential foundational truths of the Gospel. I would agree that this call to the relentless clinging to the Gospel of Jesus is needed in our churches. We are easily destracted into trying to please people and seemingly happy to just let parts of the message that are unpalatable to some go. Chandler rightly points out that if our message is not causing some to reject to their own destruction - if everyone is liking the message - than it is not the Gospel we are preaching. Their were a couple of spots in the book that didn't seem to add much. And Chandler has a penchant for liberal doses of pop culture references and slang which to me seemed to cheapen and lessen the impact of his message. Overall though it is worth the read. ( )
  KenMcLain | Jul 18, 2017 |
In this book Matt Chandler discusses how the gospel is key, but how often the gospel is not the focus of the church. Even churches who profess the Gospel often times are not really focused on it. ( )
  JWarrenBenton | Jan 4, 2016 |
In this book Matt Chandler discusses how the gospel is key, but how often the gospel is not the focus of the church. Even churches who profess the Gospel often times are not really focused on it. ( )
  JWarrenBenton | Jan 4, 2016 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Matt Chandlerprimary authorall editionscalculated
Wilson, Jaredsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wilson, Jaredsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed

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Too few people attending church today, even those in evangelical churches, are exposed to the gospel explicitly. Sure, many will hear about Jesus, and about being good and avoiding bad, but the gospel message simply isn't there--at least not in its specificity and its fullness. Inspired by the needs of both the overchurched and the unchurched, and bolstered by the common neglect of the explicit gospel within Christianity, Matt Chandler has written this punchy treatise. He begins with the specifics of the gospel--outlining what it is and what it is not--and then switches gears to focus on the fullness of the gospel and its massive implications on both personal and cosmic levels. Recognizing our tendency to fixate on either the micro or macro aspects of the gospel, Chandler also warns us of the dangers on either side--of becoming overly individualistic or syncretistic. Here is a call to true Christianity, to know the gospel explicitly, and to unite the church on the amazing grounds of the good news of Jesus!.

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