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Mal No Pensamento Moderno: Uma Historia…
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Mal No Pensamento Moderno: Uma Historia Alternativ (Em Portugues do… (edition 2003)

by Susan Neiman (Author)

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425446,146 (3.93)4
Evil threatens human reason, for it challenges our hope that the world makes sense. For eighteenth-century Europeans, the Lisbon earthquake was manifest evil. Today we view evil as a matter of human cruelty, and Auschwitz as its extreme incarnation. Examining our understanding of evil from the Inquisition to contemporary terrorism, Susan Neiman explores who we have become in the three centuries that separate us from the early Enlightenment. In the process, she rewrites the history of modern thought and points philosophy back to the questions that originally animated it. Whether expressed in theological or secular terms, evil poses a problem about the world's intelligibility. It confronts philosophy with fundamental questions: Can there be meaning in a world where innocents suffer? Can belief in divine power or human progress survive a cataloging of evil? Is evil profound or banal? Neiman argues that these questions impelled modern philosophy. Traditional philosophers from Leibniz to Hegel sought to defend the Creator of a world containing evil. Inevitably, their efforts--combined with those of more literary figures like Pope, Voltaire, and the Marquis de Sade--eroded belief in God's benevolence, power, and relevance, until Nietzsche claimed He had been murdered. They also yielded the distinction between natural and moral evil that we now take for granted. Neiman turns to consider philosophy's response to the Holocaust as a final moral evil, concluding that two basic stances run through modern thought. One, from Rousseau to Arendt, insists that morality demands we make evil intelligible. The other, from Voltaire to Adorno, insists that morality demands that we don't. Beautifully written and thoroughly engaging, this book tells the history of modern philosophy as an attempt to come to terms with evil. It reintroduces philosophy to anyone interested in questions of life and death, good and evil, suffering and sense.… (more)
Member:MarcelinoNt
Title:Mal No Pensamento Moderno: Uma Historia Alternativ (Em Portugues do Brasil)
Authors:Susan Neiman (Author)
Info:Difel (2003), 392 pages
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Evil in Modern Thought: An Alternative History of Philosophy by Susan Neiman

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I'll start my review with a quote from Hannah Arendt, she was talking about a German soldier that gave his life to save the lives of Jews. "the lessons of such stories is simple and within eveybody's grasp. Policicall speaking, it is that under conditions of terror most people will comply but some people will not, just as the lessons of the countries in which the Final Solution was proposed it that 'it could happen' in most places but it did not happen everywhere. Humanly speaking, no more is required, and no more can reasonable be asked, for this planet to remain a place fit for human habitation." The writer, Ms. Neiman, wrote how philosophers from the earthquate of Lisbon to Auschwitz conformed the issue of evil and that is what is uplifting about this dark topic, they conformed the issue. Perhaps there is no clear understanding how evil happens or how to prevent it expect to believe or to have the hope that evil does not have to happen. I found this book to be very thoughful and left with a lot to think about but also hopeful. ( )
1 vote michaelbartley | Sep 20, 2008 |
Reviewed by Fred Rush for NDPR here:

http://ndpr.nd.edu/review.cfm?id=1211

Reviewed by Walter Sundberg for First Things here:

http://firstthings.com/ftissues/ft0301/reviews/sundberg.html
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  chrisbrooke | Dec 16, 2005 |
The Search for Understanding class at St. Michael's Episcopal Cathedral here in Boise, Idaho is studying this text, and we're having a blast! Very dense, stimulating, and incisive -highly recommended. You'll never think of the Lisbon earthquake, Kant, or theodicies the same way ever again.
  kencf0618 | Oct 1, 2005 |
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The eighteenth century used the word Lisbon much as we use the word Auschwitz today.
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Evil threatens human reason, for it challenges our hope that the world makes sense. For eighteenth-century Europeans, the Lisbon earthquake was manifest evil. Today we view evil as a matter of human cruelty, and Auschwitz as its extreme incarnation. Examining our understanding of evil from the Inquisition to contemporary terrorism, Susan Neiman explores who we have become in the three centuries that separate us from the early Enlightenment. In the process, she rewrites the history of modern thought and points philosophy back to the questions that originally animated it. Whether expressed in theological or secular terms, evil poses a problem about the world's intelligibility. It confronts philosophy with fundamental questions: Can there be meaning in a world where innocents suffer? Can belief in divine power or human progress survive a cataloging of evil? Is evil profound or banal? Neiman argues that these questions impelled modern philosophy. Traditional philosophers from Leibniz to Hegel sought to defend the Creator of a world containing evil. Inevitably, their efforts--combined with those of more literary figures like Pope, Voltaire, and the Marquis de Sade--eroded belief in God's benevolence, power, and relevance, until Nietzsche claimed He had been murdered. They also yielded the distinction between natural and moral evil that we now take for granted. Neiman turns to consider philosophy's response to the Holocaust as a final moral evil, concluding that two basic stances run through modern thought. One, from Rousseau to Arendt, insists that morality demands we make evil intelligible. The other, from Voltaire to Adorno, insists that morality demands that we don't. Beautifully written and thoroughly engaging, this book tells the history of modern philosophy as an attempt to come to terms with evil. It reintroduces philosophy to anyone interested in questions of life and death, good and evil, suffering and sense.

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