HomeGroupsTalkExploreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Text and Story: Narrative Studies in New Testament Textual Criticism (2011)

by Peter R. Rodgers

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
6None2,229,548NoneNone
Did the Jesus of St. Luke's Gospel come to heal the brokenhearted (4:18)? Did Mark's Jesus call his disciples to prayer and fasting (9:29), and did he cry from the cross, "My God, my God, why have you persecuted me?" (15:34). Did St. Paul write to the Romans that God works all things together for good for those who love him (8:28)? Did the author of Hebrews declare that Jesus died apart from God (2:9)? These statements are found in the manuscript tradition of the New Testament, but are not included in our standard printed editions or translations. Peter Rodgers argues that these and other textual variations should be reconsidered. After reviewing ten important verses using the traditional areas of text-critical inquiry (manuscript evidence, internal criteria such as style, and transcriptional probabilities), Rodgers turns our attention to important but neglected narrative features indicated by quotations, allusions, and echoes of the Old Testament. These references to the story told in the Scriptures of Israel shed new light on the passages considered, offering fresh material and greater perspective for making judgments about the original text.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
For Kathy, Mark, Ben, and Amanda
First words
Introduction
The purpose of this book is to make a subject students often consider boring and complicated into one that is exciting and accessible.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Did the Jesus of St. Luke's Gospel come to heal the brokenhearted (4:18)? Did Mark's Jesus call his disciples to prayer and fasting (9:29), and did he cry from the cross, "My God, my God, why have you persecuted me?" (15:34). Did St. Paul write to the Romans that God works all things together for good for those who love him (8:28)? Did the author of Hebrews declare that Jesus died apart from God (2:9)? These statements are found in the manuscript tradition of the New Testament, but are not included in our standard printed editions or translations. Peter Rodgers argues that these and other textual variations should be reconsidered. After reviewing ten important verses using the traditional areas of text-critical inquiry (manuscript evidence, internal criteria such as style, and transcriptional probabilities), Rodgers turns our attention to important but neglected narrative features indicated by quotations, allusions, and echoes of the Old Testament. These references to the story told in the Scriptures of Israel shed new light on the passages considered, offering fresh material and greater perspective for making judgments about the original text.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: No ratings.

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 165,961,167 books! | Top bar: Always visible