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Wolves & Honey: A Hidden History of the…
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Wolves & Honey: A Hidden History of the Natural World (2004)

by Susan Brind Morrow

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This short book is just packed with word pictures of the natural world; with simple facts about bees and coyotes and apples (or figs); with bits of history, word origins and geology. And much to my delight, it is centered around all of those things as they exist (or once did) in the Finger Lakes region of New York State, a place I love and recognize. It wanders a bit, or sometimes feels as though it's wandering, but ultimately everything fits together in a personal way. I think it is absolutely brilliant, and belongs on the shelf with Pilgrim at Tinker Creek and High Tide in Tucson and everything John McPhee and Stephen Jay Gould wrote. ( )
  laytonwoman3rd | Jun 17, 2016 |
This may be a premature evaluation but I found this book to be a bit unorganized. Maybe if I read it again I'll feel differently. There are definitely treasures to be pulled out of the book and as an evening read, especially if you are not at home and not looking for anything in particular to get out of a book, this one will surprise you with a lot of interesting human stories on ecology, botany and horticulture. ( )
  riskedom | Jul 2, 2012 |
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Last night I dreamt I saw Bob Kime.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0618098569, Hardcover)

Susan Brind Morrow brings her singular sensibility as a classicist and linguist to this strikingly original reflection on the fine but resilient threads that bind humans to the natural world. Anchored in the emblematic experiences of a trapper and a beekeeper, Wolves and Honey explores the implications of their very different relationships to the natural world, while illuminating Morrow’s own poignant experience of the lives and tragic deaths of these men who deeply influenced her.
Ultimately for Morrow these two — the tracker and trapper of wolves, the keeper of bees — are a touchstone for a memoir of the land itself, the rich soil of the Finger Lakes region in upstate New York. From the ancient myth of the Tree of Life to the mysterious reappearance of wolves in the New York wilderness, from the inner life of the word “nectar,” whose Greek root (“that which overcomes death”) reveals our most fundamental experience of wonder, to the surprising links between the physics of light and the chemistry of sweetness, Morrow’s richly evocative writing traces startling historical, scientific, and metaphorical resonances.
Wolves and Honey, attuned to the connections among various realms of culture and nature, time and language, jolts us into thinking anew about our sometimes neglected but always profound relationship to the natural world.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:03 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Prompted by the emotional loss of two friends, one a trapper and one a beekeeper, the author explores the implications of their very different relationships to the natural world. The book is ultimately a touchstone and memoir of the land itself, in upstate New York.… (more)

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