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Sweet's Anglo-Saxon Primer

by Henry Sweet

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407246,983 (3.71)5
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...The preterite subjunctive is often expressed by should and would with an infinitive, as in Modern English. Scolde is used after verbs of desiring, requesting and commanding: --biddende pone JSlmiktigan pat he him arian scolde (praying the Almighty to have mercy on him). In the following example the verb of commanding is understood from the noun arende;--he sgnde to pam cyninge beotlic arende, pcet he a bugan scolde to his mannradenne, gif he his feores rohte (he sent to the king an arrogant message, that he was to turn to his allegiance, if he cared about his life). Wolde is used after verbs of purpose: --se cyning eode inn pat he wolde geseon pa pe par sdton (the king went in to see those who were sitting there). Infinitive. After verbs of commanding tue infinitive often seems to have a passive sense: --hie heton him sgndan maran fultum (they ordered that more forces should be sent to them). So also after verbs of hearing, 'fee.: --pat maste wal pe 7ve sgegan hierdon (the greatest slaughter we have heard told of). In such cases an indefini'.i pronoun has been omitted: 'ordered them to send..' etc. Geeund. The gerund is uaed--(i) to express purpose: --ut eode se sawere his sad to sawenne (the sower went forth to sow his seed). (2) it defines or determines an adjective (adverb or noun): hit is scandlicymb swelc to sprecenne (it is shameful to speak of such things). PREPOSITIONS. Some prepositions govern the accusative, such as purh (through), ymbe (about); some the dative (and instrumental), such as after (after), ar (before), at (at), be (by), binnan (within), biitan (without), for (for), fram (from), of (of), to (to). Some govern both accusative and dative, such as ofer (over), on (on, in), under (under). The general rule is that when mot… (more)
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» See also 5 mentions

Showing 2 of 2
Not a great tutorial, but a handy brief reference. ( )
  cjrecordvt | Aug 13, 2016 |
The ancient and invaluable first introduction to Old English language and literature. ( )
  bjenks | Aug 15, 2014 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Henry Sweetprimary authorall editionscalculated
Davis, NormanEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1896 edition. Excerpt: ...The preterite subjunctive is often expressed by should and would with an infinitive, as in Modern English. Scolde is used after verbs of desiring, requesting and commanding: --biddende pone JSlmiktigan pat he him arian scolde (praying the Almighty to have mercy on him). In the following example the verb of commanding is understood from the noun arende;--he sgnde to pam cyninge beotlic arende, pcet he a bugan scolde to his mannradenne, gif he his feores rohte (he sent to the king an arrogant message, that he was to turn to his allegiance, if he cared about his life). Wolde is used after verbs of purpose: --se cyning eode inn pat he wolde geseon pa pe par sdton (the king went in to see those who were sitting there). Infinitive. After verbs of commanding tue infinitive often seems to have a passive sense: --hie heton him sgndan maran fultum (they ordered that more forces should be sent to them). So also after verbs of hearing, 'fee.: --pat maste wal pe 7ve sgegan hierdon (the greatest slaughter we have heard told of). In such cases an indefini'.i pronoun has been omitted: 'ordered them to send..' etc. Geeund. The gerund is uaed--(i) to express purpose: --ut eode se sawere his sad to sawenne (the sower went forth to sow his seed). (2) it defines or determines an adjective (adverb or noun): hit is scandlicymb swelc to sprecenne (it is shameful to speak of such things). PREPOSITIONS. Some prepositions govern the accusative, such as purh (through), ymbe (about); some the dative (and instrumental), such as after (after), ar (before), at (at), be (by), binnan (within), biitan (without), for (for), fram (from), of (of), to (to). Some govern both accusative and dative, such as ofer (over), on (on, in), under (under). The general rule is that when mot

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