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I have the right to be a child by Alain…
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I have the right to be a child (edition 2012)

by Alain Serres

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18518147,868 (3.95)None
Describes what it means to be a child with rights, emphasizing that these rights belong to every child on the planet, and makes evident that knowing and talking about these rights are the first steps toward making sure that they are respected.
Member:chris_a_hart
Title:I have the right to be a child
Authors:Alain Serres
Info:Toronto : Groundwood Books/House of Anansi Press, 2012.
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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I Have the Right to Be a Child by Alain Serres

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"From the bold opening assertion, “I am a child with eyes, hands, a voice, a heart, and rights,” to the urgent closing plea, “We need our rights to be respected now—today,” this primer invites young readers to think about their universal rights as children as embodied in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

An engaging child narrator explains that kids have a right to: a name, a family, a country, food and water, shelter, medicines and help if their bodies don’t “work as well as other children’s.” Kids have a right to go to school, to refuse to work, to express themselves, to play and create, to be protected from disasters and wars, to be free from violence, and to breathe air “pure as the blue sky.” These rights apply to all children regardless of gender, race, size, wealth or country if they live in one of the 193 countries ratifying the Convention. Readers may be surprised, however, to discover the United States is not one of these countries. Engagingly naive acrylic illustrations spanning double-page spreads evoke Chagall in their use of flat patterns, swirling lines, vibrant hues, and symbolic, powerful dream-like images of the repertoire of children’s rights.

Provocative and guaranteed to spark awareness of children’s rights. (note on the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child; list of states party to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child) (Picture book. 4-7)" www.kirkusreviews.com, A Kirkus Starred Review
  CDJLibrary | Feb 26, 2022 |
I think this book is important to read to children. I think it is important because children should know their rights but also their worth. If we read this book to them they will understand their human rights and stand up for themselves but also for each other. I really enjoy this book I think children tend not to stand up from themselves because they are taught adults know better and they allow bad adults get away with things.
  Galiana.Carranza | Oct 17, 2019 |
I️ really enjoyed this book, it talked about the rights of a child.
  Remi.Kauffman | Sep 5, 2019 |
This book nearly brought me to tears. And to think that the US has not adopted this law astounds me. I believe this is an important book to read to young children so they know what they deserve and have the right to be.
  Stella.Felix | Sep 5, 2019 |
Great book. I love the colorful, abstract illustrations. It talks about the rights that every child should have. Children should have, food, water, a home, access to medical treatment, and education. These are just a few rights the book talks about. Sadly this is not the case for many children. There are children all over the world that lack access to basic things that are needed to survive. This would be a great book to help children understand human rights and how not everyone is fortunate enough to have some things many take for granted. The back of the book explains what the Convention on the Rights of the Child is and what countries have agreed to it. ( )
  csheldon | Dec 2, 2018 |
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Alain Serresprimary authorall editionscalculated
Fronty, AuréliaIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Describes what it means to be a child with rights, emphasizing that these rights belong to every child on the planet, and makes evident that knowing and talking about these rights are the first steps toward making sure that they are respected.

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