HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Preaching the Whole Bible as Christian Scripture: The Application of Biblical Theology to Expository Preaching

by Graeme Goldsworthy

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
979321,432 (4.4)None
While strong, gospel-centered preaching abounds, many Christian pastors and lay preachers find it difficult to preach meaningfully from the Old Testament. This practical handbook offers help. Graeme Goldsworthy teaches the basics of preaching the whole Bible in a consistently Christ-centered way. Goldsworthy first examines the Bible, biblical theology, and preaching and shows how they relate in the preparation of Christ-centered sermons. He then applies the biblical-theological method to the various types of literature found in the Bible, drawing out their contributions to expository preaching focused on the person and work of Christ. Clear, complete, and immediately applicable, this volume will become a fundamental text for teachers, pastors, and students preparing for ministry.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 2 of 2
For the Christian preacher that, like Paul, is determined to only know and proclaim, “Jesus Christ and Him crucified” (2 Cor. 2:2), Graeme Goldsworthy has produced a work that is exceptionally appropriate. Preaching the Whole Bible as Christian Scriptures is an examination of homiletic practice that either places Jesus at the heart, or makes application to our Lord, during every sermon. The theme of the work can be summed up easily: preaching should be Christ-centered. Goldsworthy makes two very salient points in the “Introduction:” (1) in “academic curricula” there is a division established between the Testaments that is rigidly maintained, and (2) in writing, Biblical theologies are presented as either theologies of the Old Testament or theologies of the New Testament (xiii). It is from this understanding that Goldsworthy seeks to elucidate a Biblical theology that incorporates Christ as the central figure from the beginning to the end of the Cannon. This volume is divided into two primary parts: basic questions that are asked about the Bible which is then followed by a practical application of biblical theology for preaching. There is an extensive “Bibliography” that provides a playground for future reading, an “Index of Authors” and “Index of Subjects,” and an “Index of Scriptural References.” As Goldsworthy has divided the work into two parts, we will select one chapter from each section to examine that reflects the theme of the entire work.

In the first section, which addresses questions asked about the Bible, it is in Chapter 8 – “What Is the Structure of Biblical Revelation?” (pp. 97-114) – that Goldsworthy really seems to apply the theme of the work. The point made at the beginning of the chapter is that we need to start with the definitive fulfilling of the Gospel and allow this to illuminate the structure and significance of the Old Testament revelation. This means that when a text is encountered in the Old Testament, the text should be placed within salvation history and its relationship is linked theologically to the advent of the Christ before making application to the hearer.

Goldsworthy indicates that the progression of salvation history then can be visualized as a linier pathway beginning from the creation/fall to Abraham in which there is a progressive revelation of the kingdom of God, this revelation physically reaches its zenith with the kingly reign of David and Solomon. After this time there is a progressive decline of the kingdoms of Israel and Judah which continues to the end of the Old Testament, but it is at the beginning of this progressive decline when the work of the prophets begins in earnest. The work of the latter prophets takes on a decided air of judgment of the nation (and nations), but along with judgment comes the word of comfort and restoration also presented in the prophetic utterances. Although the message of the prophets is couched in “the terminology of Israel’s past history,” (108) the prophets portray what is to come as a solid reality as there is a promise being made by God of the salvific event of the Messiah. Jesus then fulfills all the expectations of the Old Testament and points forward to the second coming and the new creation as the completion of the salvation history of the Scriptures.

From this discussion, Goldsworthy shows in Diagram 7 the application of “macro-typology” (112) to the entirety of salvation history. From the creation to the schism of Judah and Israel is seen as the kingdom in Israel’s history. It is within this epoch that the type is established in the progressive building up of the pattern of salvation. A second epoch is indicated in the kingdom in prophecy which begins with the split in the physical kingdom and ends with the prophecies of Zechariah and Malachi. It is in this second epoch where the history of Israel no longer develops the theme of salvation, but the prophets become the focus of a proclamation of a future epoch that is to come. The third epoch described begins with the birth of Jesus and will continue until the new creation. It is in this epoch that the fulfillment of the foreshadowing in the previous two epochs is completed in the Christ. “The entire epoch of salvation history from Abraham to David and Solomon, is confirmed in prophetic eschatology, and fulfilled in Christ. All aspects of Old Testament salvation history bear a typological relationship to Christ.” (112) As Goldsworthy notes, this analysis underlines the fact that all texts of the “Bible bear a discernable relationship to Christ” (113) and are primarily intended to be a testimony to him.

In the second section of the work Goldsworthy begins to examine the individual literately genres to show their relationship to the advent of the Messiah (the Old Testament) or their relationship to the finished work and future second advent (the New Testament). Each section follows a similar pattern in which the chapter begins with a visual representation of the placement of the genre in salvation history and a discussion of the specific textual unit in biblical-theological context. After that discussion three to four sections from the genre are selected and those sections are examined to show their relationship to the Messiah and how those sections might be represented of other sections in the genre. After that, some literary and historical considerations are discussed, and finally tips for preaching the genre are given.

One could easily review any specific section, but the theme of the book almost demands that Chapter 16 – “Preaching from the Gospels” (222-232) – be the focus review for the second half of the work. As Goldsworthy notes, “the gospels complete the salvation history picture of the Bible by presenting Jesus Christ as the fulfillment of the Old Testament promises and hopes of the future salvation of God’s people” (Dia. 16, 222). Although many preachers feel very comfortable with the texts of the Gospels, placing the genre in the proper biblical-theological context does not happen automatically.

It is important to recognize that the relationship that Jesus had with his 1st century disciples is not the same relationship that Jesus has with his disciples today. Therefore, we must be diligent not to simply place ourselves into the text as if we are also standing in the physical presence of the Lord. The exegete must take care not to move from the narrative to ourselves without a consideration of the biblical theology, at its worst this type of exegesis presents the teachings of Jesus as simple moralism. There is an intent in the words of Jesus that needs to be understood, and that intent highlights a biblical-theological structure within the Gospels that shows a “significant modification from the Old Testament perspective of the day of the Lord.” In the Gospels one moves from an expectation of fulfillment as expressed in the Old Testament, thru the life and ministry of Jesus, to a “distinctly New Testament perspective on eschatology that clearly differentiates the first and second comings of Christ” (224). With the first advent of the Christ one moves from expectation and hope (the type) to the fulfillment (antitype).

The discussion of the individual sections of the Gospels begins with the genealogies of Jesus, which Goldsworthy notes often becomes little more than individual character studies. There is a rich theology embedded in the genealogies that show a progression thru the various epochs leading to the Messiah and highlighting the fact that understanding salvation history as presented in the Old Testament points like a beacon to the Messiah’s advent in the New. While Matthew shows a Messiah that is the seed of Abraham that fulfills the promise, Luke shows us that Jesus is the last and most significant individual among the sons of God. After a discussion of the temple cleansings and the parable of the Good Samaritan, Goldsworthy considers the postresurrection appearances. There is distinct theology in the perspective of John as he records an encounter with Mary Magdalene and another with Thomas. In the encounter with Mary Jesus specifically tells her not to touch him, yet in the encounter with Thomas Jesus specifically tells him to put his hand in the wounds. The difference is seen in the belief factor. Mary believes Jesus is alive but must be reminded that the return of Jesus does not mean “business as usual;” but, Thomas – who does not believe – must be reminded of the “continuity of things, not the radical discontinuity” (229). Both are confronted with a living Jesus, but both also must understand there is a change in the relationship.

Looking at the literary and historical considerations, Goldsworthy begins by noting that the Gospels form a new genre that developed from the need to communicate the event of the Messiah’s advent. Further, the Gospels show an affinity for the Old Testament in their frequent reference to genres of history, prophecy, and wisdom as evidence for the Messiah is amassed. The literary structure of the Gospels obviously serves a theological purpose, so the preacher should keep in mind that structure when presenting sermons. Along these lines, when planning sermons, Goldsworthy suggests that biblical theology should be of primary importance, but care should be taken not to only choose favorite passages and avoid those passages that do not speak to “our particular concerns or preoccupations” (231). Those parts of the Gospels that are presented should be placed within a theological context and not presented as a series of disjointed parts that do not relate to the whole purpose of the Gospel genre which is more than simply about conversion. “It is about life, about living by faith, about living with God, about knowing who Jesus is and what he ahs done, about what God is like” (232).

It should not be surprising that Goldsworthy identifies Jesus Christ as the hermeneutical key to the Scriptures, and the application of that key to the Scriptures is seen as the primary consideration of the homiletician. By making application of the Biblical texts to the Gospel message as presented thru the Christ first, the hearer then can be brought into closer unity with the heart of the Scriptures as application is made. Goldsworthy’s conversational style is well suited for the lay preacher while the more advanced student of the Scriptures will find deeper theological nuggets scattered throughout for further consideration. All those that preach should have a center to their message and this work helps the preacher find that center in its Christological emphasis.

Quotes from the work:

“Salvation history implies a recognition that Yahweh, the God of Israel, and the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, is the Lord of history. History happens because of his decrees.” (28)

“The ontological nature of the Trinity can be expressed by saying that if God had never created anything, and thus there never was a human race that needed to be saved and that could be indwelt, God would still be Father, Son, and Holy Spirit from eternity to eternity.” (66)

“Let us state this fact as a rule of thumb: the New Testament basis for ethical decisions is no longer Moses on Sinai but Christ on Calvary. This is not to drive a wedge between the two, however, for they are related. Christ on Calvary embraces and completes the principles that lie behind the law of Moses.” (96)

“To understand the relationship of this text [2 Samuel 6] to the gospel, we must be ready to pursue the great themes of kingship, the dwelling of God among his people, and the temple.” (147)

“Placing a label on a literary form or genre is not the issue. The preacher is under constraint to try to understand how the particular text functions as a vehicle for God’s word. The identification of the genre is important only if it helps us in this task.” (180)

“As interesting as much of the end of the world speculation of some might be, it is more likely that John wrote the whole book [Revelation] to encourage first-century Christians in their struggle.” (217)

“We can preach our hearts out on texts about what we ought to be, what makes a mature church, or what the Holy Spirit wants to do in our lives, but if we do not constantly, in every sermon, show the link between the Spirit’s work in us to Christ’s work for us, we will distort the message and send people away with a natural theology of salvation by works.” (237) ( )
  SDCrawford | Sep 8, 2018 |
Probably my second favorite book on preaching. A must read. ( )
  nate77 | Oct 4, 2007 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

While strong, gospel-centered preaching abounds, many Christian pastors and lay preachers find it difficult to preach meaningfully from the Old Testament. This practical handbook offers help. Graeme Goldsworthy teaches the basics of preaching the whole Bible in a consistently Christ-centered way. Goldsworthy first examines the Bible, biblical theology, and preaching and shows how they relate in the preparation of Christ-centered sermons. He then applies the biblical-theological method to the various types of literature found in the Bible, drawing out their contributions to expository preaching focused on the person and work of Christ. Clear, complete, and immediately applicable, this volume will become a fundamental text for teachers, pastors, and students preparing for ministry.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Current Discussions

None

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (4.4)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 11
4.5 1
5 12

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 205,770,925 books! | Top bar: Always visible