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Magical Journey: An Apprenticeship in Contentment

by Katrina Kenison

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617352,528 (3.73)None
A book for every woman whose children have grown up, but who's not done growing herself, in which the author explores the belief that even as old identities are outgrown, new ones begin to beckon.
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Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
Good book. Woman's journey after kids grow up. Timely for my life. ( )
  avdesertgirl | Aug 22, 2021 |
Although reading Katrina Kenison's second and third books back-to-back gave me a bit of a "more of the same" feeling, when the thing that's the same is so very, very good as her remarkable, meditative writing is, that's not a bad thing. I finished this book while on vacation with my husband's extended family in San Diego, and floating in the delicious water of the Pacific Ocean while basking in the constant, lovely sunshine was the perfect place to think on Katrina Kenisons's words and the wisdom she discovers in the post-children at home, post-first major death phase of her life that this book covers. After a bracing swim in a Maine lake, Kenison reflects: "I am still a novice in this work of losing and letting go. Sometimes, all I want is to hold on tight to everything . . . Yet moments flow, one into another. The world turns, its heart is never still. All I can do is listen for the pulse, live my life, inhale and exhale." (p. 229) Yes. And I'm grateful for the reminder, Katrina. Thank you. ( )
  CaitlinMcC | Jul 11, 2021 |
So, I'm not an empty nester, in fact I have about 12 more years of kids in the nest, but I like to know what's coming. I supposed I picked it up because my oldest birdie, a high schooler, is flapping her wings and making me face what comes next. I think the author has some wonderful insight into those years. I plan to keep and reread this when the time comes. ( )
  Jandrew74 | May 26, 2019 |
this book is haunting in it's honesty as Katrina goes on a journey to reflect on her life and answer "what now?"

I believe books come into your life when you need them, and that's what happened to me with this book. It spoke to me deeply. What I take away from this book is "chose love, not fear", and to believe in myself. To allow myself to just be.

There is so much in this book that every reader will find something to identify with.

Katrina wrote a beautiful, haunting, magical book. ( )
  katsmiao | Oct 23, 2015 |
this book is haunting in it's honesty as Katrina goes on a journey to reflect on her life and answer "what now?"

I believe books come into your life when you need them, and that's what happened to me with this book. It spoke to me deeply. What I take away from this book is "chose love, not fear", and to believe in myself. To allow myself to just be.

There is so much in this book that every reader will find something to identify with.

Katrina wrote a beautiful, haunting, magical book. ( )
  katsmiao | Oct 23, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
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A book for every woman whose children have grown up, but who's not done growing herself, in which the author explores the belief that even as old identities are outgrown, new ones begin to beckon.

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