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On Dupont Circle: Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt and the Progressives Who Shaped Our World

by James Srodes

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401620,605 (3.33)1
Prize-winning author James Srodes offers a vivid and scintillating portrait of the twelve young men and women who, on the eve of World War I, came together in Washington, D.C.'s tony Dupont Circle neighborhood. They were ambitious for personal and social advancement, and what bound them together was a sheer determination to remake America and the rest of the world in their progressive image. At one residence-known ironically as The House of Truth-lived Felix Frankfuter, a future Supreme Court Justice, and Walter Lippman, later the most important political writer of the twentieth century. Another house served as the base for three siblings: John Foster Dulles, future Secretary of State, Allen Dulles, one of the founders of the CIA, and sister Eleanor Lansing Dulles, one of the most important economists of the age. Meanwhile, nearby lived young Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, who even then were rising political stars, William Bullitt, a charming and unscrupulous writer and future ambassador, and Herbert Hoover, already the most famous American in the world. The group mixed cocktails, foreign policy, and bed-mates as they set out to remake the world. For the next twenty years they pursued increasingly important careers as their private lives become ever more entangled. By the end of this story, on the eve of WWII, the group came together again for a second chance at history-this time the result was the United Nations.… (more)
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A fine history of the first half of the 20th Century, tracing the lives and careers of Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Herbert Hoover and various other lesser-known figures such as Walter Lippmann, Felix Frankfurter, William Bullitt, Sumner Welles, the Dulles brothers and a range of others. Not really a scholarly history, at times gossipy and fun to read, this book sheds light on the meaning of "progressive" to a generation of progressives that is much more diverse and idealistic than what the term suggests today. I'd recommend it to fans of non-fiction, popular history and those who would like to understand more about the diplomatic history of the United States. It also helps to explain how the world we know came into being. ( )
  STLreader | Aug 15, 2020 |
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Prize-winning author James Srodes offers a vivid and scintillating portrait of the twelve young men and women who, on the eve of World War I, came together in Washington, D.C.'s tony Dupont Circle neighborhood. They were ambitious for personal and social advancement, and what bound them together was a sheer determination to remake America and the rest of the world in their progressive image. At one residence-known ironically as The House of Truth-lived Felix Frankfuter, a future Supreme Court Justice, and Walter Lippman, later the most important political writer of the twentieth century. Another house served as the base for three siblings: John Foster Dulles, future Secretary of State, Allen Dulles, one of the founders of the CIA, and sister Eleanor Lansing Dulles, one of the most important economists of the age. Meanwhile, nearby lived young Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, who even then were rising political stars, William Bullitt, a charming and unscrupulous writer and future ambassador, and Herbert Hoover, already the most famous American in the world. The group mixed cocktails, foreign policy, and bed-mates as they set out to remake the world. For the next twenty years they pursued increasingly important careers as their private lives become ever more entangled. By the end of this story, on the eve of WWII, the group came together again for a second chance at history-this time the result was the United Nations.

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