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5,179981,461 (3.92)70
"You may not know it, but you've met Augusten Burroughs. You've seen him on the street, in bars, on the subway, at restaurants: a twenty-something guy, nice suit, works in advertising. Regular. Ordinary. But when the ordinary person had two drinks, Augusten was circling the drain by having twelve; when the ordinary person went home at midnight, Augusten never went home at all. Loud, distracting ties, automated wake-up calls, and cologne on the tongue could only hide so much for so long. At the request (well, it wasn't really a request) of his employers, Augusten lands in rehab, where his dreams of group therapy with Robert Downey, Jr., are immediately dashed by the grim reality of flourescent lighting and paper hospital slippers. But when Augusten is forced to examine himself, something actually starts to click, and that's when he finds himself in the worst trouble of all. Because when his thirty days are up, he has to return to his same drunken Manhattan life - and live it sober. What follows is a memoir that's as moving as it is funny, as heartbreaking as it is real. Dry is the story of love, loss, and Starbucks as a higher power."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)
  1. 20
    A Million Little Pieces by James Frey (tashtashtash)
  2. 21
    Tweak by Nic Sheff (tashtashtash)
  3. 00
    When You Are Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris (sweetiegherkin)
    sweetiegherkin: These two nonfiction books deal with giving up a vice (alcohol and, to a lesser extent, drugs for Burroughs; cigarettes for Sedaris) and both do so with dark humor scattered throughout their memoirs. That being said, Sedaris's work is more funny than serious while the opposite is true for Burroughs's. Also, Sedaris's book is largely short stories/vignettes while Burroughs's follows a more traditional narrative. Both men are homosexual and that plays some factor in their books, although it's not the overarching story and/or theme.… (more)
  4. 00
    Hooked: Five Addicts Challenge Our Misguided Drug Rehab System by Lonny Shavelson (meggyweg)
  5. 00
    Lolito by Ben Brooks (mediapuzzle)
    mediapuzzle: There are some parallels between these novels around people out of control and using alcohol. Funny and serious at the same time.
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» See also 70 mentions

English (96)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (97)
Showing 1-5 of 96 (next | show all)
I didn't like this as much as Running with Scissors but again very funny. ( )
  baruthcook | Aug 26, 2020 |
Not sure how a memoir could be both intoxicating and sobering at the same time, but Burroughs manages to pull it off with Dry. It's less psychedelically implausible and more realistic than Running with Scissors, but it is just as hysterical and touching. Burroughs knows how to write a sentence and tell a tale. It would be easy for him to glamorize his alcoholism, or turn this into a self-pitying confessional. Instead, he is able to detach his authorial perspective from the rest of himself and write about his struggles with sobriety, relationships, and reality with withering insight. ( )
  ChristopherSwann | May 15, 2020 |
Ever since I read Infinite Jest I have been more open to fictional accounts of recovery and AA's program. The Patrick Melrose novels, listening to Marc Maron, even watching the TV show Mom. One aspect I admire in these tellings, and used to good effect here in Dry, is when the main character admits the silliness and banality of all the sayings and practices of recovery as promoted by AA, and yet every time eventually has to admit that the simple act of repetition seems to offer some type of magic that works. Burroughs includes all the great hallmarks of the "addict story," including the epic binge and regret cycle, past history non-helpful inertia and pain, incredulous surprise at recovery's occasional successes, and constant day-to-day (sometimes minute-to-minute) battle with the self. Burroughs' well-written style is very engaging and hard to put down. ( )
  23Goatboy23 | Jan 17, 2020 |
Oh yuck. What can I say about a hack named Chris Robinson who changed his name to Augusten Xon Burroughs? Cheekiness isn't enough for me. ( )
  Adammmmm | Sep 10, 2019 |
Augusta Burroughs, a Manhattan advertising employee, recounts his years of hard drinking and his battle to overcome alcoholism.
  JRCornell | Dec 8, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 96 (next | show all)
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In memory of George Stathakis / For my brother / And for Dennis
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Sometimes when you work in advertising you'll get a product that's really garbage and you have to make it seem fantastic, something that is essential to the continued quality of life.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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"You may not know it, but you've met Augusten Burroughs. You've seen him on the street, in bars, on the subway, at restaurants: a twenty-something guy, nice suit, works in advertising. Regular. Ordinary. But when the ordinary person had two drinks, Augusten was circling the drain by having twelve; when the ordinary person went home at midnight, Augusten never went home at all. Loud, distracting ties, automated wake-up calls, and cologne on the tongue could only hide so much for so long. At the request (well, it wasn't really a request) of his employers, Augusten lands in rehab, where his dreams of group therapy with Robert Downey, Jr., are immediately dashed by the grim reality of flourescent lighting and paper hospital slippers. But when Augusten is forced to examine himself, something actually starts to click, and that's when he finds himself in the worst trouble of all. Because when his thirty days are up, he has to return to his same drunken Manhattan life - and live it sober. What follows is a memoir that's as moving as it is funny, as heartbreaking as it is real. Dry is the story of love, loss, and Starbucks as a higher power."--BOOK JACKET.

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