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Psalm 44 (Serbian Literature) by Danilo Kiš
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Psalm 44 (Serbian Literature) (original 1962; edition 2012)

by Danilo Kiš (Autor)

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621429,026 (4)3
"Psalm 44" is the last major work of fiction by Danilo Kis to be translated into English, and his only novel dealing explicitly with Auschwitz (where his own father died). Written when he was only twenty-five, before embarking on the masterpieces that would make him an integral figure in twentieth-century letters, Psalm 44 shows Kis at his most lyrical and unguarded, demonstrating that even in "the place of dragons... covered with the shadow of death," there can still be poetry. Featuring characters based on actual inmates and warders--including the abominable Dr. Mengele--"Psalm 44" is a baring of many of the themes, patterns, and preoccupations Kis would return to in future, albeit never with the same starkness or immediacy.… (more)
Member:bodhisei
Title:Psalm 44 (Serbian Literature)
Authors:Danilo Kiš (Autor)
Info:Dalkey Archive Press (2012), 148 pages
Collections:Your library
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Psalm 44 (Serbian Literature) by Danilo Kiš (1962)

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» See also 3 mentions

The little creature kept crying in the intense blackness of the night, and his voice rose, twisting like a vine, like a stalk of some miraculous green plant glimpsed among the cavities of skulls, amid the ashes of a fireplace, from out of the entrails of a corpse; and from far away replied the cannon, proclaiming the terrible love between nations.

The creature is a child. The place Auschwitz. Psalm 44 is a lyrical hiss: what are you going to do with your gift of life? The wage was paid for my ass, here is an itemized receipt. Kiš inserts the personal into his woeful tale. The protagonist's father shares his own dad's name. Both were lost in the dark clouds of the Shoah.

I bought this for my wife for Christmas. She read it yesterday, I today. It is an elliptical tale, paced with omissions and flashbacks. Psalm 44 remains as sinuous as Kiš' vine of the necropolis.

It was sublime here today, rather warm and the sun laughed openly, mocking the remaining snow. I felt guilty about that just now.

( )
  jonfaith | Feb 22, 2019 |
Der Psalm 44 zählt zu den Klageliedern, in einem seiner Verse heißt es, an Gott gerichtet: "Du gibst uns preis wie Schlachtvieh, und unter die Völker hast du uns zerstreut." Auch wenn es sinnlos ist, dem Holocaust eine religiöse Dimension zuzuschreiben, bleibt die unverrückbare literarische Kraft des Textes, der im 20. Jahrhundert erschreckende Aktualität erfahren hat – man sollte sich mit ihm vertraut machen, wenn man sich auf die Lektüre des Romans Psalm 44 von Danilo Kiš einlässt, der nun, reichlich verspätet, dafür beeindruckend übersetzt, Eingang in die deutschsprachige Literaturöffentlichkeit findet.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Danilo Kišprimary authorall editionscalculated
Rakusa, IlmaAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wolf-Grießhaber, KatharinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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"Psalm 44" is the last major work of fiction by Danilo Kis to be translated into English, and his only novel dealing explicitly with Auschwitz (where his own father died). Written when he was only twenty-five, before embarking on the masterpieces that would make him an integral figure in twentieth-century letters, Psalm 44 shows Kis at his most lyrical and unguarded, demonstrating that even in "the place of dragons... covered with the shadow of death," there can still be poetry. Featuring characters based on actual inmates and warders--including the abominable Dr. Mengele--"Psalm 44" is a baring of many of the themes, patterns, and preoccupations Kis would return to in future, albeit never with the same starkness or immediacy.

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