HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

The Adventures of Ed Tuttle, Associate Justice, and Other Stories

by Jay Wexler

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
216844,961 (2.75)None
A collection of short stories by a Boston University professor. It's about norms and abnorms, rules and unrules, law and unlaw, lawyers and nonlawyers. Whimsical, incisive, and fun. A zoo with only black and white animals. A camp where children are forced to gather clams or face a trip to the “hot box.” A Supreme Court Justice’s confirmation hearing presided over by the 1977 Kansas City Royals. 'The Adventures of Ed Tuttle, Associate Justice, and Other Stories' transports the reader to these hilarious places and beyond. This is a world, according to Dan Kennedy, host of The Moth Storytelling Podcast, “where corporate cafeteria lunch servers blurt out Kierkegaard quotes to soften the hard luck of a low supply of the ‘lunch beans’ that two raging alcoholic white collar workers crave daily; a world where an HMO in-network dentist hovers over patients and instead of asking about their flossing habits or aches, asks what it is that they like best about him; a world where television sitcoms are set on death row. That’s nothing—that’s the tip of the iceberg.” These stories, illustrations, and other errata are as funny as they are strange, as wonderful as they are wacky. “This is funny stuff, and I hope that Jay Wexler will donate his brain to neuroscience so we can see what’s up with it.” — Steven Pinker, Harvard College Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, and author of 'How the Mind Works' “Jay Wexler is my kind of writer—that is to say, a weird one, and a wry one, and one who isn't afraid to act silly in a sort of bait-and-switch that, to the reader's surprise, moves him as much as it makes him laugh. Like all the best comedians, Wexler is clearly nursing a heart that the world broke a long time ago. 'Ed Tuttle' is a book that can't decide what it wants to be when it grows up, but as with most cases of arrested development, there’s something very serious going on behind all the antics. Plus, there are pictures.” — Ron Currie, Jr., author of 'Everything Matters!' “With a smart, irreverent style that never fails to delight, Jay Wexler is the 1977 Kansas City Royals of humor writing.” — Christopher Monks, author of 'The Ultimate Game Guide to Your Life' and Editor, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency “Jay Wexler writes as if he has the ghost of James Thurber haunting him. These stories and sketches will hurt your gut and then tickle your brain. You need this humor. It'll be a hard week without it.” — William Giraldi, author of 'Busy Monsters'… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I think it is really hard to write good short stories. Stephen King is one of the best authors out there for short stories and his collections are hit and miss. This book of short stories is definitely hit and miss. There are some pretty good ones in the front of the book, including the title story about Ed Tuttle, The Advisor (about a campaign volunteer and his interactions with the candidate), and a bizarre story about lunch beans. Many of these stories involve the law or lawyers, which makes sense as the author is a law professor. I found many of the stories trying to be funny and quirky but the combination just didn't work for me. There are some gems in this collection but I found the first 1/3 of the book contained most of them. According to the information about the author, he is working on a novel with Ed Tuttle. I would probably pick that one up. ( )
  walterqchocobo | Nov 3, 2012 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
I found most of the stories within "The Adventures of Ed Tuttle Associate Justice and Other Stories" to be pretty weird and they didn’t strike my fancy. I did enjoy the first three stories, and thought the story titled "The Adventures of Ed Tuttle" could be expanded into a full-blown novel. From there on however, the topics became increasingly strange as if they were spawned from one’s inexplicable dreams and some just seemed like a mish-mash of random parts of speech thrown together. Maybe I just don’t have the background experience or smarts to get this author. ( )
  starboard | Oct 5, 2012 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Highly disappointed in this book although I think that is mostly my own fault. This book simply was just not my cup of tea. I found much of the satire depressing and disturbing rather than funny. Although I did enjoy Wexler's experiments with writing styles and story types it all just made me unhappy feeling. I only got through half of this book because I couldn't make myself read anymore. But like I mentioned in the beginning, this book was just not my style and others may find it more enjoyable. ( )
  LVassmer | Oct 5, 2012 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Wexler's collection of stories is permeated with the attitude that only years spent in the Washington DC area can bring. The stories are absurd, witty, and enjoyable in their variety. Like any collection of short works, there are hits and misses but the satire and undertones of thereof bring a smile to the reader's face more often than note. While the overall feel of the text can come off as a little dry or perhaps prone to inside humor, this reader found the passages playful and fun. The experimentation in story structure were refreshing and made the book actually seem more cohesive. There were several unexpected lines that were absolute gems. The stories carry consistent themes despite the variable quality but it should be noted that the general quality of the book is high. The book could be overwhelming to a casual reader or to one trying to sit down with it for extended periods of time but taken in chunks, this makes for an entertaining read. Wexler has a strong debut with this collection and it will be interesting to see how he handles a longer format. ( )
  loafhunter13 | Sep 27, 2012 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Prof. Wexler's collection of short stories is a trip through a variety of landscapes, not all of which relate to the law or lawyers. I read the "black and white zoo" story out loud to my kids, it was so hilarious. Many of the other stories, though, were head scratchers: alien law librarians, frequent negative experiences with clams, and so on.

Some attempts at humor fell entirely flat, or made me wonder whether they were intended to be funny or not. Lawyers who love baseball will enjoy the reimagining of Supreme Court Justice Sotomayor's appointment hearing but most of the nuance of who the participants were and the importance of things like the infield fly rule were lost on me.

My lack of enthusiasm for this book is as much connected to my expectations (that it would be about the law, it would be funny, etc.). Prof. Wexler writes well and readers who enjoy short stories, especially those that are a bit unusual, will probably enjoy this book. ( )
  davidpwhelan | Sep 27, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 6 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

A collection of short stories by a Boston University professor. It's about norms and abnorms, rules and unrules, law and unlaw, lawyers and nonlawyers. Whimsical, incisive, and fun. A zoo with only black and white animals. A camp where children are forced to gather clams or face a trip to the “hot box.” A Supreme Court Justice’s confirmation hearing presided over by the 1977 Kansas City Royals. 'The Adventures of Ed Tuttle, Associate Justice, and Other Stories' transports the reader to these hilarious places and beyond. This is a world, according to Dan Kennedy, host of The Moth Storytelling Podcast, “where corporate cafeteria lunch servers blurt out Kierkegaard quotes to soften the hard luck of a low supply of the ‘lunch beans’ that two raging alcoholic white collar workers crave daily; a world where an HMO in-network dentist hovers over patients and instead of asking about their flossing habits or aches, asks what it is that they like best about him; a world where television sitcoms are set on death row. That’s nothing—that’s the tip of the iceberg.” These stories, illustrations, and other errata are as funny as they are strange, as wonderful as they are wacky. “This is funny stuff, and I hope that Jay Wexler will donate his brain to neuroscience so we can see what’s up with it.” — Steven Pinker, Harvard College Professor of Psychology, Harvard University, and author of 'How the Mind Works' “Jay Wexler is my kind of writer—that is to say, a weird one, and a wry one, and one who isn't afraid to act silly in a sort of bait-and-switch that, to the reader's surprise, moves him as much as it makes him laugh. Like all the best comedians, Wexler is clearly nursing a heart that the world broke a long time ago. 'Ed Tuttle' is a book that can't decide what it wants to be when it grows up, but as with most cases of arrested development, there’s something very serious going on behind all the antics. Plus, there are pictures.” — Ron Currie, Jr., author of 'Everything Matters!' “With a smart, irreverent style that never fails to delight, Jay Wexler is the 1977 Kansas City Royals of humor writing.” — Christopher Monks, author of 'The Ultimate Game Guide to Your Life' and Editor, McSweeney’s Internet Tendency “Jay Wexler writes as if he has the ghost of James Thurber haunting him. These stories and sketches will hurt your gut and then tickle your brain. You need this humor. It'll be a hard week without it.” — William Giraldi, author of 'Busy Monsters'

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

LibraryThing Early Reviewers Alum

Jay Wexler's book The Adventures of Ed Tuttle, Associate Justice, and Other Stories was available from LibraryThing Early Reviewers.

Sign up to get a pre-publication copy in exchange for a review.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (2.75)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5 2
3 2
3.5 1
4
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 159,022,131 books! | Top bar: Always visible