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The Code of the Woosters by P. G. Wodehouse
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The Code of the Woosters (1938)

by P. G. Wodehouse

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Jeeves (6)

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2,875502,887 (4.34)139
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» See also 139 mentions

English (47)  Dutch (2)  Italian (1)  All languages (50)
Showing 1-5 of 47 (next | show all)
I had high expectations of this book since it is on a number of 'best book' lists. However, I don't find it substantially better than the other Wodehouse books. There were certainly very humorous lines but this book follows the Wodehouse standard formula - a lot of glitches but all resolved at the end. Here, it is by the brilliance of Jeeves. And sometimes it wasn't hard to guess what the solution is. It is also a bit too long and was a bit draggy at times, as Wooster just ran into roadblock after roadblock, and you wonder when it will end. ( )
  siok | Aug 12, 2018 |
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: Code of the Woosters
Series: The Jeeves Omnibus #1.2
Author: P.G. Wodehouse
Rating: 3.5 of 5 Stars
Genre: Humor
Pages: 263
Format: Digital Edition

Synopsis:


Bertie Wooster is bamboozled into helping out various friends and relatives as they try to get what they want, whether it be a wife, a husband, a policeman's helmet, a diary, a superb chef or even a silver cow creamer, Bertie is at his best, messing everything up. Since he has ignored Jeeves' recommendation to take a world tour on a cruise ship, Jeeves is less than completely helpful.

But in the end Jeeves doesn't let his master down and everything works out ok for everyone except for the Justice of the Peace who once fined Bertie Wooster 5 pounds. Imagine the gall!

My Thoughts:

I enjoyed this but it was just a touch too long. If Wodehouse had knocked it back to 200 pages, the humor would have been more palatable. I mean, after a point rich people having problems like not being able to keep their cook just isn't funny when you're dealing with 8 other rich people, almost all of whom are so stupid it is surprising they haven't walked in front of a bus yet, all dealing with similar “problems”. It starts out funny but like a fish, starts to smell after a while.

That being said, up until the 75% mark, there were quite a few instances where I was just chortling to myself at the pure outrageousness of the happenings. I mean, Bertie is such a good hearted idiot that you want him to succeed even while knowing he's an idiot and is going to flub things up.

I only gave this 3stars back in '02 even while my review from then leads me to believe I found it funnier back then than this time around. However, I wasn't actually using a 5star system (that started in '07 or '09 with my time at Goodreads) but retconn'ed all my books into the 5star system. I was using some vague and completely subjective 100 point system based on my highschool grading system. Man, how the times they have a'changed!

Despite all my complaining, I did enjoy this quite a bit and laughed out loud enough times so that Mrs B stopped asking me what I was laughing about. I think that says just how good this book actually was.

★★★☆½ ( )
1 vote BookstoogeLT | Jul 16, 2018 |
Always fun and kooky, reading about Wooster and Jeeves. ( )
  jennannej | Jul 10, 2018 |
Wodehouse doing Wodehouse - classic! ( )
  tgraettinger | Jul 5, 2018 |
My blog post about this book is at this link. ( )
  SuziQoregon | May 16, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 47 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (29 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
P. G. Wodehouseprimary authorall editionscalculated
Cockburn, AlexanderIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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I reached out a hand from under the blankets, and rang the bell for Jeeves.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This book was provisionally titled The Silver Cow before being published as The Code of the Woosters.
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Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
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Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Bertie Wooster is in the proverbial soup again. On this occasion, the problem concerns a certain cow-creamer that should have belonged to Uncle Tom, but, with the use of trickery, was purchased by Sir Watkyn Bassett. Aunt Dahlia insists that Bertie steal it back, but Sir Watkyn and his companion Roderick Spode are on to him. To make matters worse, Stephanie Byng also has an ingenious plan to endear her fiancé to her uncle (none other than Sir Watkyn) that entails Bertie stealing the cow-creamer. And she's willing to use blackmail. Damned if he does the deed and damned if he doesn't (or rather beaten to a pulp by Spode) Bertie needs Jeeves's assistance more desperately than ever. (Penguin blurb)
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0394720288, Mass Market Paperback)

P.G.Wodehouse's best-loved creation by far is the master-servant team of Bertie Wooster, the likable nitwit, and Jeeves, his effortlessly superior valet and protector. This unlikely duo is as famous as Holmes and Watson, Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, and Tracy and Hepburn, but they have their own very special inimitable charm. According to Walter Clemons, Newsweek, "They are at their best in The Code of the Woosters," in which Bertie is rescued from his bumbling escapades time and time again by that gentleman's gentleman: Jeeves.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:20 -0400)

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Bertie Wooster is rescued from his bumbling escapades time and time again by his superior valet and protector Jeeves.

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W.W. Norton

An edition of this book was published by W.W. Norton.

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