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The Mad Scientist's Daughter

by Cassandra Rose Clarke

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3533964,573 (3.81)18
Nominated for the Phillip K. Dick Award, a science fiction fairy tale set in a collapsing future America about a girl and the android she falls in love with.When Cat Novak was a young girl, her father brought Finn, an experimental android, to their isolated home. A billion-dollar construct, Finn looks and acts human, but he has no desire to be one. He was programmed to assist his owners, and performs his duties to perfection.His primary task now is to tutor Cat. Finn stays with her, becoming her constant companion and friend as she grows into adulthood. But when the government grants rights to the ever-increasing robot population, Finn struggles to find his place in the world. As their relationship goes further than anyone intended, they have to face the threat of being separated forever.… (more)
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» See also 18 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
This is weird.
Reminded me of Isaac Asimov somehow.
Bittersweet and sad.
Also - not without fair share of problems. ( )
  QuirkyCat_13 | Jun 20, 2022 |
Couldn't finish this one, I don't like or care about any of the characters and plot is just too predictable. ( )
  fellanta13 | Feb 14, 2022 |
A near future story that reminded me several times of Silver Metal Lover, only I didn't care as much about the characters.
Finn meets Cat when she is very young when he's brought around to be her tutor, he's an advanced android that's almost human looking. The relationship develops over time and they part when she goes to college. There she explores life and later marries, a man who turns out to be almost more inhuman than Finn has every been.
When she leavves him she finds that Finn is gone to the Moon and that she misses him more than she realised, but her father is ill and she's pregnant and she has to start making choices and growing up.
There's a lot of smoking in this and some instances where consent is questionable in some actions, but it's not a bad read, I just don't think I would really re-read it. ( )
  wyvernfriend | Jan 21, 2021 |
In all my years as a reader, only two books managed to make me cry. The Mad Scientist’s Daughter almost got the third spot! Throughout most of the book I had a huge lump in my throat and several times at had to put the book down to make sure I wouldn’t cry – the melancholy from Cat hit me straight on.

The story unfolds at a very slow pace which was a bit boring at times, but as a hole it worked really well. It gives the reader a change to get to know Cat in a different way. The writing is just beautiful and it pulled me in between the pages every time I turned on my Kindle.
We meet Cat when she is approximately 6 years old and she meets Finn for the very first time. In the beginning, she thinks he is a ghost which I found so endearing. But in general Cat is a cute and innocent as a child. My problem with her only starts when she enters college; she becomes so cold-hearted and indifferent about everything. It eats me up that she cares so little about things and to me it seems like she just uses Finn at first – he is only a robot, he exists to please her needs. She makes some stupid choices but she changes during the story and her spirit from her childhood slowly enlightens again. The slow development of Cats feelings is heartbreaking and makes the book a long and beautiful love story.

The book opens up some really tough questions; when are you human? When do you have rights? What is love? If something looks human, acts human but isn’t human, how do you deal with it? This book is definitely worth a read! It took me through the entire scale of feelings and I loved every step. Cassandra Rose Clarke is an amazing writer!
( )
  Hyms | Aug 9, 2020 |
When Cat Novak was a young girl, her father brought Finn, an experimental android, to their isolated home. A billion-dollar construct, Finn looks and acts human, but he has no desire to be one. He was programmed to assist his owners, and performs his duties to perfection.

His primary task now is to tutor Cat. Finn stays with her, becoming her constant companion and friend as she grows into adulthood. But when the government grants rights to the ever-increasing robot population, Finn struggles to find his place in the world. As their relationship goes further than anyone intended, they have to face the threat of being separated forever. ( )
  Gmomaj | Aug 9, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 39 (next | show all)
If you’re looking for a robot apocalypse, The Mad Scientist’s Daughter isn’t it. This is, instead, the sort of tragic romance—in the traditional sense of the terms, where the former requires a fatal flaw and the latter is a longing backward through time for a perceived innocent past—in which a scientist father brings home an android to serve as nanny and tutor to his very young daughter.
added by KelMunger | editLit/Rant, Kel Munger (Jul 6, 2013)
 
The Mad Scientist's Daughter seems to be the result of an author taking an interesting premise that could have gone in many different directions and putting every effort toward maximizing the impact a romance kindling slowly through friendship and separation, letting what might have been other, orthogonal qualities fall by the wayside. . . . As a novel successful within its limited ambitions, The Mad Scientist's Daughter merits a limited recommendation. Readers who enjoy detailed character studies will find much to like here, assuming they aren't frustrated by Cat's wholly inward life.
 
It's not a story of future heroism. It's not even, really, a story about robots. It's a story of live and failure and expectations. It is, perhaps, in its relentless examination of one woman's life, one of the most realistic science fiction stories ever told.
added by karenb | editio9, Michael Ann Dobbs (Feb 28, 2013)
 
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Nominated for the Phillip K. Dick Award, a science fiction fairy tale set in a collapsing future America about a girl and the android she falls in love with.When Cat Novak was a young girl, her father brought Finn, an experimental android, to their isolated home. A billion-dollar construct, Finn looks and acts human, but he has no desire to be one. He was programmed to assist his owners, and performs his duties to perfection.His primary task now is to tutor Cat. Finn stays with her, becoming her constant companion and friend as she grows into adulthood. But when the government grants rights to the ever-increasing robot population, Finn struggles to find his place in the world. As their relationship goes further than anyone intended, they have to face the threat of being separated forever.

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“Cat, this is Finn. He’s going to be your tutor.”

Finn looks and acts human, though he has no desire to be. He was programmed to assist his owners, and performs his duties to perfection. A billion-dollar construct, his primary task now is to tutor Cat. As she grows into a beautiful young woman, Finn is her guardian, her constant companion… and more.

But when the government grants rights to the ever-increasing robot population, however, Finn struggles to find his place in the world.

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