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Blood Music (Ibooks Science Fiction…
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Blood Music (Ibooks Science Fiction Classics) (edition 2005)

by Greg Bear

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2,464454,495 (3.79)77
Nebula Award Finalist: A genetic engineering breakthrough may portend the destruction of humanity in this cyberpunk novel by the author of The Forge of God. This Hugo and Nebula Award finalist follows present-day events in which the fears concerning the nuclear annihilation of the world subsided after the Cold War and the fear of chemical warfare spilled over into the empty void it left behind. An amazing breakthrough in genetic engineering made by Vergil Ulam is considered too dangerous for further research, but rather than destroy his work, he injects himself with his creation and walks out of his lab, unaware of just how his actions will change the world. Author Greg Bear's treatment of the traditional tale of scientific hubris is both suspenseful and a compelling portrait of a new intelligence emerging amongst us, irrevocably changing our world. … (more)
Member:sister_ray
Title:Blood Music (Ibooks Science Fiction Classics)
Authors:Greg Bear
Info:IBooks, Inc. (2005), Paperback, 350 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:science fiction, genetics, biology, disaster, post-holocaust, nebula award nominee, hugo award nominee, got for free

Work details

Blood Music by Greg Bear

  1. 20
    Brain Plague by Joan Slonczewski (sandstone78)
    sandstone78: For sentience at the microscopic level affecting human life and behavior.
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English (42)  Spanish (1)  Finnish (1)  All languages (44)
Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
Had read some of his work that he had written in Asimov's Foundation series, enjoyed that so picked this up and really enjoyed this too. Good plot ( )
  aldimartino | Nov 24, 2020 |
Had read some of his work that he had written in Asimov's Foundation series, enjoyed that so picked this up and really enjoyed this too. Good plot ( )
  Andy_DiMartino | Nov 24, 2020 |
"Blood Music" was a great sci-fi novel. I'd seen it around for years, but never gotten to picking it up and reading it.

It begins with a genetic research scientist, Vergil Ulam, and his personal research done at the lab where he works. He's brilliant, but not entirely ethical, although he doesn't see it that way, he feels he's entitled to what he does, for instance, he sees no problem hacking into a university's computer to fake his academic record, because he knows he's capable of the job he's doing, the managers just need a "sound and light show" to go with it.

Any coincidence that Vergil's last name is Ulam, the same as the "father" of the hydrogen bomb?

Ulam's personal research is into converting individual cells into computers, with memory and processing power. His earlier work, E. Coli cells is successful, but each individual cell has only the brain power of a mouse. Later he uses some of his own white blood cells, and they each end up with the brain power of a monkey.

But when his boss finds out about it, and doesn't want anything to become public for fear of hurting the company's IPO, he orders Vergil to destroy his work. Vergil starts to, but then feels like they're his children and instead of destroying all, injects some (a few million cells) back into his body, intending to extract them again once he finds a job in another lab.

And that's how his intelligent research gets out of the lab and changes the world...

Overall I enjoyed it till the changes towards the end that left me sort of confused. ( )
  KevinRubin | Aug 11, 2020 |
genetic science creates intelligent cells which run amok
  ritaer | Apr 23, 2020 |
I think I like the concept of this book more than the execution. It's not badly written and the "normal" parts aren't too difficult to read. Bear is also pretty creative with a couple of different narrative styles throughout the book which I enjoyed.

But the fake science parts were a slog and pretty boring. And sadly there is a lot of fake science bits to get through.

The characters aren't particularly well developed, and one set is swapped out for another halfway through the novel anyway, but it's actually the parts relating to the characters that I enjoyed reading the most. Which probably doesn't say anything good about the rest of the book.

( )
  Fardo | Oct 15, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 42 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (27 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Greg Bearprimary authorall editionscalculated
Brautigam, DonCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jetter, FrancesCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Salwowski, MarkCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wachtenheim, DorothyCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Astrid - Luxury, necessity, obsession With all my love
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Each hour, a myriad of trillion of little live things - microbes, bacteria, the peasants of nature - are born and die, not counting for much except in the bulk of their numbers and the accumulation of their tiny lives.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Nebula Award Finalist: A genetic engineering breakthrough may portend the destruction of humanity in this cyberpunk novel by the author of The Forge of God. This Hugo and Nebula Award finalist follows present-day events in which the fears concerning the nuclear annihilation of the world subsided after the Cold War and the fear of chemical warfare spilled over into the empty void it left behind. An amazing breakthrough in genetic engineering made by Vergil Ulam is considered too dangerous for further research, but rather than destroy his work, he injects himself with his creation and walks out of his lab, unaware of just how his actions will change the world. Author Greg Bear's treatment of the traditional tale of scientific hubris is both suspenseful and a compelling portrait of a new intelligence emerging amongst us, irrevocably changing our world. 

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Vergil Ulam's breakthrough in genetic engineering is considered too dangerous for further research. Rather than destroy his work, he injects himself with his creation and walks out of his lab, unaware of just quite how his actions will change the world. Bear's treatment of the traditional tale of scientific hubris is suspenseful and a compelling portrait of a new intelligence emerging amongst us and changing our world irrevocably.
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