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Ebony Rising: Short Fiction of the Greater Harlem Renaissance Era

by Craig Gable (Editor)

Other authors: Gwendolyn B. Bennett (Contributor), Marita Bonner (Contributor), Arna Bontemps (Contributor), Anita Scott Coleman (Contributor), Marion Vera Cuthbert (Contributor)33 more, Darryl Dickson-Carr (Introduction), W.E.B. Du Bois (Contributor), Alice Dunbar-Nelson (Contributor), Jessie Redmon Fauset (Contributor), Rudolph Fisher (Contributor), Mercedes Gilbert (Contributor), Eugene Gordon (Contributor), Ottie B. Graham (Contributor), Angelina Weld Grimke (Contributor), Chester Himes (Contributor), Langston Hughes (Contributor), Zora Neale Hurston (Contributor), Georgia Douglas Johnson (Contributor), S. Miller Johnson (Contributor), Nella Larsen (Contributor), John F. Matheus (Contributor), Claude McKay (Contributor), May Miller (Contributor), Marian Minus (Contributor), Richard Bruce Nugent (Contributor), Maude Irwin Owens (Contributor), Leila Amos Pendleton (Contributor), Ted Poston (Contributor), J Saunders Redding (Contributor), Florida Ruffin Ridley (Contributor), George S. Schuyler (Contributor), Eloise Bibb Thompson (Contributor), Wallace Thurman (Contributor), Jean Toomer (Contributor), Eric Walrond (Contributor), Dorothy West (Contributor), Richard Wright (Contributor), Octavia B. Wynbush (Contributor)

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Ebony Rising is the first comprehensive, gender-balanced collection of short fiction from the greater Harlem Renaissance era (1912-1940). This was a time marked by writing of extraordinary breadth and depth by some of the most famous authors in African American literary history. Among them were Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Toomer, Dorothy West, and Claude McKay. Not surprisingly, these authors have received an unprecedented amount of critical attention, and their work remains popular to this day. For this anthology, Craig Gable has selected 52 short stories by 37 writers (20 women and 17 men) representing a wide range of style, form, subject matter, and social awareness. To underscore the movement's growth and change, the stories are arranged chronologically by year of publication. Some will be familiar to readers; many more will not, for this is not the "greatest hits" of the Harlem Renaissance. Instead, readers will find a remarkable collection of fiction by authors famous and obscure--some who lived in New York City and others who never resided there. There are stories set in Harlem, but they are just as likely to take place elsewhere in the United States. Alongside traditional stories, there are examples of detective fiction, political satire, even science fiction, with a few experiments in narrative structure and form for good measure. The stories take up issues of race, marriage, parenthood, crime, politics, religion, work, abuse, old age, and death--in short, the stuff of life, and of compelling and lasting fiction. A selected bibliography documents some 300 books and articles on the Harlem Renaissance. There is a separate list of sources for other short stories by the authors appearing in this anthology; a list of award-winning short fiction from two black literary contests of the day; timelines of important historical, literary, and cultural events; and other aids for teachers, students, and reading groups.… (more)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Gable, CraigEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bennett, Gwendolyn B.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bonner, MaritaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bontemps, ArnaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Coleman, Anita ScottContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Cuthbert, Marion VeraContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dickson-Carr, DarrylIntroductionsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Du Bois, W.E.B.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dunbar-Nelson, AliceContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fauset, Jessie RedmonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fisher, RudolphContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gilbert, MercedesContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Gordon, EugeneContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Graham, Ottie B.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Grimke, Angelina WeldContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Himes, ChesterContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hughes, LangstonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hurston, Zora NealeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Johnson, Georgia DouglasContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Johnson, S. MillerContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Larsen, NellaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Matheus, John F.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
McKay, ClaudeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Miller, MayContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Minus, MarianContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Nugent, Richard BruceContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Owens, Maude IrwinContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Pendleton, Leila AmosContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Poston, TedContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Redding, J SaundersContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ridley, Florida RuffinContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Schuyler, George S.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Thompson, Eloise BibbContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Thurman, WallaceContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Toomer, JeanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Walrond, EricContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
West, DorothyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wright, RichardContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Wynbush, Octavia B.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Ebony Rising is the first comprehensive, gender-balanced collection of short fiction from the greater Harlem Renaissance era (1912-1940). This was a time marked by writing of extraordinary breadth and depth by some of the most famous authors in African American literary history. Among them were Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Jean Toomer, Dorothy West, and Claude McKay. Not surprisingly, these authors have received an unprecedented amount of critical attention, and their work remains popular to this day. For this anthology, Craig Gable has selected 52 short stories by 37 writers (20 women and 17 men) representing a wide range of style, form, subject matter, and social awareness. To underscore the movement's growth and change, the stories are arranged chronologically by year of publication. Some will be familiar to readers; many more will not, for this is not the "greatest hits" of the Harlem Renaissance. Instead, readers will find a remarkable collection of fiction by authors famous and obscure--some who lived in New York City and others who never resided there. There are stories set in Harlem, but they are just as likely to take place elsewhere in the United States. Alongside traditional stories, there are examples of detective fiction, political satire, even science fiction, with a few experiments in narrative structure and form for good measure. The stories take up issues of race, marriage, parenthood, crime, politics, religion, work, abuse, old age, and death--in short, the stuff of life, and of compelling and lasting fiction. A selected bibliography documents some 300 books and articles on the Harlem Renaissance. There is a separate list of sources for other short stories by the authors appearing in this anthology; a list of award-winning short fiction from two black literary contests of the day; timelines of important historical, literary, and cultural events; and other aids for teachers, students, and reading groups.

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