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Lunch with Buddha

by Roland Merullo

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11515237,022 (4.08)20
A novel about family, open-minded spirituality, and the American road, Lunch with Buddha accompanies the characters from Breakfast with Buddha as they move further along the path toward lasting peace of mind. Facing one of life's greatest emotional challenges, Otto Ringling takes comfort in a loving family and offbeat lessons from the eccentric spiritual teacher Volya Rinpoche. Funny at times, heartbreaking at others, Lunch with Buddha offers a fresh and engaging perspective on the life we live now.… (more)
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Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
My first experience with reading Roland Merullo was "Dinner with Buddha," the third in his Buddha series of which Lunch with Buddha was the second. All three of the "Buddha" books were excellent and I have also read four other Merullo books which were also excellent.
Lunch with Buddha, like the other spiritual fiction books penned by Merullo, depicts a journey wherein various incidents allow for spiritual lessons, making the journey both a physical journey as well as a spiritual one. Each book works well as a travel story: road trips move from one place to another, usually a lesser known or out of the way location, and present the central character's impression of the various locales. Each locales also plays host to some sort of spiritual lesson, parables for larger spiritual teachings. In this way, the novelist presents some great, profound spiritual theology as applied to real-life type situations.
Merullo's use of a fiction to provide enlightenment and spiritual truths allows him to reach an audience who might not otherwise reach for a book of philosophy or spirituality. It is a great idea and succeeds well both in its philosophic aims and in offering interesting and engaging fiction.
A particular strength of these books is that they present the spirituality philosophy of the mystic who is cornerstone of each religion--Buddha in this case, Jesus in "American Savior"--rather than the theological interpretation of those philosophies as presented by the "organized religions" that formed after the mystic had died. In fact, the books frequently include episodes wherein the theological points are directly criticized. In Lunch with Buddha, for example, the theological heresy of "God Hates Fags" and of any theology that includes judgment, intolerance, hatred and calls for violence are all directly portrayed and unmasked for the frauds they are.
This book and its two companion volumes makes good fiction, good philosophy and good reading.
( )
  PaulLoesch | Apr 2, 2022 |
I really enjoyed this 2nd book in the series, but it wouldn't satisfy everyone. I found reading about a three day solitary retreat exciting and interesting. If you are interested in such things I highly recommend this novel. ( )
  kevn57 | Dec 8, 2021 |
Book begins with a shocker; I wasn't expecting to learn of this devastatingly sad and grim event that had occurred months earlier. Changes tenor of book from first book in series. Not really. I just didn't pick up on it.

The first book did include a horrendously severe event which led to first road trip. So this book, Lunch with Buddha, should not have shocked me. For some reason I found the first to be lighter and more humorous despite inclusion of serious topics and thoughts.

I felt that Lunch with Buddha was a heavier, more disconsolate, ominous read, much less humorous. It was as though Merullo was sending us a warning that the human race is running out of time. We need to modify our thoughts and behaviors now by censuring intolerance, hate, prejudice, racism, and the hypocrisy of the self-righteous.

During their 2nd road trip Volya continues to teach Otto how to mediate more deeply to find that inner holy spirit (the soul). This allows contemplation of life as temporary; and replaces anger, hostility, esentment, and depression with gentleness, kindness, patience, understanding, sincerity, gratitude, and peace.

Wonderful read of the potential of love in all of us!
  Bookish59 | Jul 8, 2020 |
My first experience with reading Roland Merullo was "Dinner with Buddha," the third in his Buddha series of which Lunch with Buddha was the second. All three of the "Buddha" books were excellent and I have also read four other Merullo books which were also excellent.
Lunch with Buddha, like the other spiritual fiction books penned by Merullo, depicts a journey wherein various incidents allow for spiritual lessons, making the journey both a physical journey as well as a spiritual one. Each book works well as a travel story: road trips move from one place to another, usually a lesser known or out of the way location, and present the central character's impression of the various locales. Each locales also plays host to some sort of spiritual lesson, parables for larger spiritual teachings. In this way, the novelist presents some great, profound spiritual theology as applied to real-life type situations.
Merullo's use of a fiction to provide enlightenment and spiritual truths allows him to reach an audience who might not otherwise reach for a book of philosophy or spirituality. It is a great idea and succeeds well both in its philosophic aims and in offering interesting and engaging fiction.
A particular strength of these books is that they present the spirituality philosophy of the mystic who is cornerstone of each religion--Buddha in this case, Jesus in "American Savior"--rather than the theological interpretation of those philosophies as presented by the "organized religions" that formed after the mystic had died. In fact, the books frequently include episodes wherein the theological points are directly criticized. In Lunch with Buddha, for example, the theological heresy of "God Hates Fags" and of any theology that includes judgment, intolerance, hatred and calls for violence are all directly portrayed and unmasked for the frauds they are.
This book and its two companion volumes makes good fiction, good philosophy and good reading.
( )
  Paul-the-well-read | Apr 21, 2020 |
My first experience with reading Roland Merullo was "Dinner with Buddha," the third in his Buddha series of which Lunch with Buddha was the second. All three of the "Buddha" books were excellent and I have also read four other Merullo books which were also excellent.
Lunch with Buddha, like the other spiritual fiction books penned by Merullo, depicts a journey wherein various incidents allow for spiritual lessons, making the journey both a physical journey as well as a spiritual one. Each book works well as a travel story: road trips move from one place to another, usually a lesser known or out of the way location, and present the central character's impression of the various locales. Each locales also plays host to some sort of spiritual lesson, parables for larger spiritual teachings. In this way, the novelist presents some great, profound spiritual theology as applied to real-life type situations.
Merullo's use of a fiction to provide enlightenment and spiritual truths allows him to reach an audience who might not otherwise reach for a book of philosophy or spirituality. It is a great idea and succeeds well both in its philosophic aims and in offering interesting and engaging fiction.
A particular strength of these books is that they present the spirituality philosophy of the mystic who is cornerstone of each religion--Buddha in this case, Jesus in "American Savior"--rather than the theological interpretation of those philosophies as presented by the "organized religions" that formed after the mystic had died. In fact, the books frequently include episodes wherein the theological points are directly criticized. In Lunch with Buddha, for example, the theological heresy of "God Hates Fags" and of any theology that includes judgment, intolerance, hatred and calls for violence are all directly portrayed and unmasked for the frauds they are.
This book and its two companion volumes makes good fiction, good philosophy and good reading.
( )
  Paul-the-well-read | Apr 21, 2020 |
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A novel about family, open-minded spirituality, and the American road, Lunch with Buddha accompanies the characters from Breakfast with Buddha as they move further along the path toward lasting peace of mind. Facing one of life's greatest emotional challenges, Otto Ringling takes comfort in a loving family and offbeat lessons from the eccentric spiritual teacher Volya Rinpoche. Funny at times, heartbreaking at others, Lunch with Buddha offers a fresh and engaging perspective on the life we live now.

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