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Contagious : why things catch on by Jonah…
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Contagious : why things catch on (edition 2016)

by Jonah Berger

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1,0803719,102 (3.83)9
Business. Sociology. Nonfiction. HTML:The New York Times bestseller that explains why certain products and ideas become popular.

"Jonah Berger knows more about what makes information 'go viral' than anyone in the world." â??Daniel Gilbert, author of the bestseller Stumbling on Happiness
What makes things popular? If you said advertising, think again. People don't listen to advertisements, they listen to their peers. But why do people talk about certain products and ideas more than others? Why are some stories and rumors more infectious? And what makes online content go viral?

Wharton marketing professor Jonah Berger has spent the last decade answering these questions. He's studied why New York Times articles make the paper's own Most E-mailed list, why products get word of mouth, and how social influence shapes everything from the cars we buy to the clothes we wear to the names we give our children.

In Contagious, Berger reveals the secret science behind word-of-mouth and social transmission. Discover how six basic principles drive all sorts of things to become contagious, from consumer products and policy initiatives to workplace rumors and YouTube videos. Learn how a luxury steakhouse found popularity through the lowly cheesesteak, why anti-drug commercials might have actually increased drug use, and why more than 200 million consumers shared a video about one of the most boring products there is: a blender.

Contagious provides specific, actionable techniques for helping information spreadâ??for designing messages, advertisements, and content that people will share. Whether you're a manager at a big company, a small business owner trying to boost awareness, a politician running for office, or a health official trying to get the word out, Contagious will show you how to make your product or idea cat
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Member:booksaplentynz
Title:Contagious : why things catch on
Authors:Jonah Berger
Info:New York : Simon & Schuster Paperbacks, 2016.
Collections:Your library
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Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger

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» See also 9 mentions

English (34)  Spanish (3)  All languages (37)
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
pick up from page 61
  pollycallahan | Jul 1, 2023 |
So lightweight it is barely there. No analysis here,only stories. Takes minutes to read and then you are still hungry. ( )
  PattyLee | Dec 14, 2021 |
Light read. ( )
  KittyCatrinCat | Aug 29, 2021 |
How does marketing work in an era where things go viral on the Internet and social media dominates our national discourse? Jonah Berger, a professor at the Wharton School of Business, has an understanding of how it can work and a philosophy of how you can use it to promote your work. Using terms like “social currency” and established concepts like social status, he describes how online marketing can work in a way that is inexpensive but effective. He does so in a manner that outperforms perhaps any other author on the subject.

Berger attempts to provide a coherent and comprehensive theoretical treatment. He defines several essential and mutually exclusive qualities of communication that might effectively communicate with potential customers. In the last chapter, he brings these qualities together to show why certain online communications work or didn’t work. He provides illustrations from history (or more accurately, builds his theory from historical examples). These stories not only convey his point; they also provide a context and a story that persuades the reader that he knows what he’s talking about.

This work will certainly appeal to marketers and to communicators, but it can also appeal to people (like me) who are interested in how the computer and the Internet are transforming the way we live. This book could not have been written in the early 1990s, but is essentially a foundation of marketing theory today. Berger teaches us that theory should not lag behind practice too much. He gives us a first draft of what that theory might look like. In so doing, he teaches us how we can draw a good audience for the work that is our lives.

( )
  scottjpearson | Jan 25, 2020 |
How does marketing work in an era where things go viral on the Internet and social media dominates our national discourse? Jonah Berger, a professor at the Wharton School of Business, has an understanding of how it can work and a philosophy of how you can use it to promote your work. Using terms like “social currency” and established concepts like social status, he describes how online marketing can work in a way that is inexpensive but effective. He does so in a manner that outperforms perhaps any other author on the subject.

Berger attempts to provide a coherent and comprehensive theoretical treatment. He defines several essential and mutually exclusive qualities of communication that might effectively communicate with potential customers. In the last chapter, he brings these qualities together to show why certain online communications work or didn’t work. He provides illustrations from history (or more accurately, builds his theory from historical examples). These stories not only convey his point; they also provide a context and a story that persuades the reader that he knows what he’s talking about.

This work will certainly appeal to marketers and to communicators, but it can also appeal to people (like me) who are interested in how the computer and the Internet are transforming the way we live. This book could not have been written in the early 1990s, but is essentially a foundation of marketing theory today. Berger teaches us that theory should not lag behind practice too much. He gives us a first draft of what that theory might look like. In so doing, he teaches us how we can draw a good audience for the work that is our lives.

( )
  scottjpearson | Jan 25, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 34 (next | show all)
Author and Wharton marketing professor Jonah Berger argues that, contrary to popular belief, advertising isn’t what makes something popular, but rather the secret science behind word-of-mouth and social transmission of ideas. This book provides a set of actionable techniques for helping information spread, perfect for any PR pro hoping their story will catch on.
added by tim.taylor | editRagan, Jessica Lawlor (Oct 1, 2018)
 
Mr. Berger seems intent here on giving readers advice about how to create viral products — he is, after all, a professor of marketing — and he’s unfortunately adopted a ham-handed PowerPoint approach to selling his arguments. He cites studies with dubious metrics (how, for example, do you score newspaper articles “based on how much awe they evoked”); repeats things over and over, as if sheer repetition would create a kind of stickiness; and uses awful, gobbledygook terms like "self-sharing," "inner remarkability" and "the urgency factor."
 
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Business. Sociology. Nonfiction. HTML:The New York Times bestseller that explains why certain products and ideas become popular.

"Jonah Berger knows more about what makes information 'go viral' than anyone in the world." â??Daniel Gilbert, author of the bestseller Stumbling on Happiness
What makes things popular? If you said advertising, think again. People don't listen to advertisements, they listen to their peers. But why do people talk about certain products and ideas more than others? Why are some stories and rumors more infectious? And what makes online content go viral?

Wharton marketing professor Jonah Berger has spent the last decade answering these questions. He's studied why New York Times articles make the paper's own Most E-mailed list, why products get word of mouth, and how social influence shapes everything from the cars we buy to the clothes we wear to the names we give our children.

In Contagious, Berger reveals the secret science behind word-of-mouth and social transmission. Discover how six basic principles drive all sorts of things to become contagious, from consumer products and policy initiatives to workplace rumors and YouTube videos. Learn how a luxury steakhouse found popularity through the lowly cheesesteak, why anti-drug commercials might have actually increased drug use, and why more than 200 million consumers shared a video about one of the most boring products there is: a blender.

Contagious provides specific, actionable techniques for helping information spreadâ??for designing messages, advertisements, and content that people will share. Whether you're a manager at a big company, a small business owner trying to boost awareness, a politician running for office, or a health official trying to get the word out, Contagious will show you how to make your product or idea cat

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