HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
Search Site
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Particulars of My Life

by B. F. Skinner

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
43None475,160 (2.75)None
"With revealing -- indeed surprising -- particulars, and with a moving clarity and honesty, the great and highly controversial behaviorist, author of Beyond Freedom and Dignity and Walden Two, takes us into the flow of his own life form his small town American boyhood through his first tentative movements, in his early twenties, toward his life work. His story begins in the small railroading town of Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, in the last golden decade before the Great War. A conventional middle-class family on the way up ... the father, an attorney, dreaming of (and attempting), a political career ... the beautiful mother, devoted to her children, cold to her husband ... the loving if slightly peculiar relatives ... the classic small-town schooldays of a bright, inquisitive boy--hard work, accomplishment, the one inspiring teacher, sports, orchestra, Boy Scout camp. The first wild crushes on girls ... the morose adolescent ponderings of life and fate, the excitements and fears of sexual awakening in a still puritanically "moral" society ... the consuming desire to be a Great Writer ... This is the content, brought touchingly close, of Fred Skinner's life from his birth in 1904 through the start of the roaring twenties when he leaves home--first for Hamilton College and the years bounded by passionate devotion to books and writing (Robert Frost declared, "You have the touch of art. . . ."), wholeheartedly relished fraternity pranks, and the tragic death (in his presence, in an instant) of his younger brother. Then New York--Greenwich Village, of course--heady talk through the night with actors and writers and other struggling creative doers, and, most daring, a ménage (almost) à trois in the days of Bohemia and bootleg gin highballs. Then Europe. And we see him--at once unique and the Young Man of His Time--up to and through the moment when, at twenty-four, giving up his dream of a literary life, sensing at last where his real future is to lie, he packs his valises for Harvard and its famous graduate department of psychology. The opening volume of Dr. Skinner's autobiography, a crucial document for all those who passionately follow his thought and work, is destined to endear itself to a far wider audience by the charm and simplicity of its narrative, by its shining re-creation, never sentimental, of a lost and innocent America."--Provided by publisher.… (more)
None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS
Canonical LCC

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

"With revealing -- indeed surprising -- particulars, and with a moving clarity and honesty, the great and highly controversial behaviorist, author of Beyond Freedom and Dignity and Walden Two, takes us into the flow of his own life form his small town American boyhood through his first tentative movements, in his early twenties, toward his life work. His story begins in the small railroading town of Susquehanna, Pennsylvania, in the last golden decade before the Great War. A conventional middle-class family on the way up ... the father, an attorney, dreaming of (and attempting), a political career ... the beautiful mother, devoted to her children, cold to her husband ... the loving if slightly peculiar relatives ... the classic small-town schooldays of a bright, inquisitive boy--hard work, accomplishment, the one inspiring teacher, sports, orchestra, Boy Scout camp. The first wild crushes on girls ... the morose adolescent ponderings of life and fate, the excitements and fears of sexual awakening in a still puritanically "moral" society ... the consuming desire to be a Great Writer ... This is the content, brought touchingly close, of Fred Skinner's life from his birth in 1904 through the start of the roaring twenties when he leaves home--first for Hamilton College and the years bounded by passionate devotion to books and writing (Robert Frost declared, "You have the touch of art. . . ."), wholeheartedly relished fraternity pranks, and the tragic death (in his presence, in an instant) of his younger brother. Then New York--Greenwich Village, of course--heady talk through the night with actors and writers and other struggling creative doers, and, most daring, a ménage (almost) à trois in the days of Bohemia and bootleg gin highballs. Then Europe. And we see him--at once unique and the Young Man of His Time--up to and through the moment when, at twenty-four, giving up his dream of a literary life, sensing at last where his real future is to lie, he packs his valises for Harvard and its famous graduate department of psychology. The opening volume of Dr. Skinner's autobiography, a crucial document for all those who passionately follow his thought and work, is destined to endear itself to a far wider audience by the charm and simplicity of its narrative, by its shining re-creation, never sentimental, of a lost and innocent America."--Provided by publisher.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Popular covers

Quick Links

Rating

Average: (2.75)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2
2.5
3 2
3.5
4 1
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 163,370,937 books! | Top bar: Always visible