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The Sweet Revenge of Celia Door by Karen…
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The Sweet Revenge of Celia Door (edition 2013)

by Karen Finneyfrock (Author)

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1048174,330 (3.56)14
Member:riahonfiahh
Title:The Sweet Revenge of Celia Door
Authors:Karen Finneyfrock (Author)
Info:Viking Books for Young Readers (2013), 272 pages
Collections:LGBTQAI+
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The Sweet Revenge of Celia Door by Karen Finneyfrock

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I thought the Sweet Revenge of Celia the Door would be a nice fluffy book for me to read in between Serious books. But it is a lot more than it appears on the surface. Celia is one of the most endearing characters I have had the pleasure of meeting, and I really rooted for her, and her new friend Drake as well.
This is a great book for teenagers especially, as it is so honest about what it is like to be a teenager. I wish I had this book when I was in high school. I'll love Celia forever. ( )
  PaperbackPropensity | May 24, 2016 |
Last year, the mean girls picked on Celia, but this year she has decided to be Dark. Celia the Dark doesn't let anyone push her around, and she's determined to come up with a brilliant, poetic plan for revenge on the girls who bullied her. Of course, dealing with bullying and social ostracism isn't as simple as all that, and when you throw in complications like parents going through a separation that might end in divorce, and a new friend who is just coming out of the closet -- well, it all adds up to quite a year for Celia. Will her Dark outlook see her through?

Going in, I expected this book to dish out the teenage angst, and it does -- but what I didn't expect was that it would also be sweet and sometimes funny. Finneyfrock creates great, pitch-perfect teenage characters, but she's also able to pull out a bit of the ridiculous nature of high school (think Ferris Bueller's Day Off, for comparison). Enjoyable all the way through; this is an author I'll be sure to watch! ( )
  foggidawn | Oct 28, 2015 |
When Celia is bullied in 8th grade by Sandy and Mandy, two popular girls, she decides to start high school as “Dark Celia.” Being dark means she has hardened herself, retreating into a shell cast by her dark clothes and attitude towards others.

Read the rest of my review at: http://shouldireaditornot.wordpress.com/2013/02/26/the-sweet-revenge-of-celia-do... ( )
  ShouldIReadIt | Sep 26, 2014 |
Celia Door enters her freshman year of high school with giant boots, dark eyeliner, and a thirst for revenge against Sandy Firestone, the girl who did something unspeakable to Celia last year.

But then Celia meets Drake, the cool new kid from New York City who entrusts her with his deepest, darkest secret. When Celia's quest for justice threatens her relationship with Drake, she's forced to decide which is sweeter: revenge or friendship. ( )
  cay250 | Aug 17, 2014 |
See more reviews at The Best Books Ever.

Here's another one to file away under the "if I were a teenager, I would have enjoyed this way more" label. As an adult, I was too annoyed at how terrible these teenagers are to each other to really lose myself in the book, but as a teenager, I probably would have identified in a big way with Celia.

Celia is beginning ninth grade at Hershey High, and she's decided this year to embrace her outcast nature. She comes across as kind of punk/goth-y, always wearing thrift-shop clothes, big hoodies, dark makeup, boots, etc, and has taken to calling herself Celia the Dark. She has no friends at school and has accepted this, at least outwardly. Throughout the book, she refers to an event that happened the year before which made her turn "Dark", though we don't learn what exactly this event was until close to the end.

The book tells the story of Celia's budding friendship with Drake, a new student from New York, which winds up intersecting with the unpleasant bullying Celia experiences at school. Throughout, we are treated to snippets of Celia's poetry, which she writes in a notebook that she keeps on her at all times. And this is where I felt that Celia was near and dear to my heart -- I had my own little poetry notebook that I toted around through middle- and high-school, full of emo or sickly sweet or teenager-ly pretentious poetry about the boy I liked who didn't like me, or why people were mean, or why my life was so hard. The poetry's a much bigger part of Celia's life than it ever was in mine, but it felt familiar to me, this needing to get words out without having anyone real to say them to. I really appreciated that part of the story, even if as an adult I found it all to be a little bit overwrought.

Another hilarious story-within-a-story aspect of this book is a self-help book that Drake finds and becomes completely enraptured with. Drake and Celia read it together, and "passages" are excerpted in the novel for us. It's a perfect parody of actual real self-help books and I could easily see why someone like Drake, who is kind of adrift with little adult support in his life, would start trying to adhere to this book's suggestions 100%.

Like many contemporary YA books, I felt like the ending wrapped up a little too neatly to be totally realistic. People face consequences for their actions, sure, but it felt too easy. Hearing all too many stories about real-world bullying and schools' failure to adequately deal with it makes the way things shake out here a little hard to believe. But not every book needs to be a downer, especially contemporaries which seem to fall into the "it gets better" type of story, so I guess it works.

This book deals with many serious contemporary topics, including bullying, fighting, divorce, suicide, and coming out to friends and family. It's a very easy to read story and would probably be most enjoyed or identified with by readers around the same age as Celia (eighth to tenth grade students). I'd recommend reading along or previewing before giving it to a child, though, because of the themes. ( )
  goorgoahead | Dec 4, 2013 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0670012750, Hardcover)

That's the day the trouble started.
The trouble that nearly ruined my life.
The trouble that turned me Dark.
The trouble that begs me for revenge.

Celia Door enters her freshman year of high school with giant boots, dark eyeliner, and a thirst for revenge against Sandy Firestone, the girl who did something unspeakable to Celia last year.

But then Celia meets Drake, the cool new kid from New York City who entrusts her with his deepest, darkest secret. When Celia's quest for justice threatens her relationship with Drake, she's forced to decide which is sweeter: revenge or friendship.

This debut novel from Karen Finneyfrock establishes her as a bright, bold, razor-sharp new voice for teens, perfect for fans of The Perks of Being a Wallflower and Will Grayson, Will Grayson.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:02 -0400)

Fourteen-year-old Celia, hurt by her parents' separation, the loss of her only friend, and a classmate's cruelty, has only her poetry for solace until newcomer Drake Berlin befriends her, comes out to her, and seeks her help in connecting with the boy he left behind.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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