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The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of…
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The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914 (original 1977; edition 1978)

by David McCullough

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
3,386593,822 (4.15)1 / 131
History. Technology. Engineering. Nonfiction. HTML:The National Book Award‚??winning epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal, a first-rate drama of the bold and brilliant engineering feat that was filled with both tragedy and triumph, told by master historian David McCullough.
/> From the Pulitzer Prize‚??winning author of Truman, here is the national bestselling epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal. In The Path Between the Seas, acclaimed historian David McCullough delivers a first-rate drama of the sweeping human undertaking that led to the creation of this grand enterprise.

The Path Between the Seas tells the story of the men and women who fought against all odds to fulfill the 400-year-old dream of constructing an aquatic passageway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is a story of astonishing engineering feats, tremendous medical accomplishments, political power plays, heroic successes, and tragic failures. Applying his remarkable gift for writing lucid, lively exposition, McCullough weaves the many strands of the momentous event into a comprehensive and captivating tale.

Winner of the National Book Award for history, the Francis Parkman Prize, the Samuel Eliot Morison Award, and the Cornelius Ryan Award (for the best book of the year on international affairs), The Path Between the Seas is a must-read for anyone interested in American history, the history of technology, international intrigue, and human… (more)
Member:jjmcgaffey
Title:The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914
Authors:David McCullough
Info:Simon & Schuster (1978), Paperback, 704 pages
Collections:Your library, Currently reading, Working on, BOMBs
Rating:
Tags:History, __scan_cover, !dunno

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The Path Between the Seas: The Creation of the Panama Canal, 1870-1914 by David McCullough (1977)

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» See also 131 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 57 (next | show all)
Like all of McCullough's books, brings the subject alive through primary resources and personalities.
I even found myself interested in the engineering challenges and solutions. The medical and human challenges and personalities like Teddy Roosevelt were what really made me enjoy it though ( )
  cspiwak | Mar 6, 2024 |
Amazing story of the building of the Panama Canal at the beginning of the 20th Century. Given the tools and communications available at the time, it is an epic on overcoming incredible obstacles. It would have more stars if engineering was more exciting. ( )
  dlinnen | Feb 3, 2024 |
Here's what I wrote in 2008 about this read: "The building of the Panama Canal! First attempt by the French fails; the Americans prevail, despite extremes challenges. A good historical read!" ( )
  MGADMJK | Jul 26, 2023 |
It's been a while since I've read a David McCullough book even though every one I've read has been great. This, like the ones about the Brooklyn Bridge, the Wright Brothers, the Johnstown Flood (among others) tells a story but includes the political and cultural context as well as comprehensible engineering details. ( )
  Castinet | Dec 11, 2022 |
I found "The Path Between the Seas" to be very interesting, well researched and well written. It reads much like a novel and as it progressed I thought it got better.

McCullough organized the book in an easy to understand fashion and it progressed logically. There were some changes in the tone it was written as later chapters used more first person accounts reminiscent of Walter Lord.

Although the book was written in 1977, McCollough gives a fair and even-handed accounting of the non-American, non-white workers. He illustrates the differences in the health, diet and living conditions while indicating the canal was really made a reality by mainly West Indian labor. A fact that is very much glossed over in most contemporary accounts.

The backstory of the French attempt and the resulting political backlash was very interesting also.

I am also finding overlapping references to individuals in this book with other histories, Gorgas for example, who was featured in "The Great Influenza" by John Barry is fleshed out more as his work in Panama fighting Yellow Fever and Malaria were the seminal works of his career

This is an excellent history of a monumental project, the likes of which no longer happen. ( )
  WEPhillips | Oct 20, 2022 |
Showing 1-5 of 57 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
David McCulloughprimary authorall editionscalculated
Gardner, GroverNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Herrmann, EdwardNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Winn, PeterForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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The creation of the Panama Canal was far more than a vast, unprecedented feat of engineering. (Preface)
The letter, several pages in length and signed by the Secretary of the Navy George M. Robeson, was addressed to Commander Thomas O. Selfridge.
Among those who were profoundly stirred by the opening of the canal in August 1914 were Charles de Lesseps and Admirals Alfred Thayer Mahan and Thomas Oliver Selfridge, all three quietly retired, but each still very much alive. (Afterword)
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History. Technology. Engineering. Nonfiction. HTML:The National Book Award‚??winning epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal, a first-rate drama of the bold and brilliant engineering feat that was filled with both tragedy and triumph, told by master historian David McCullough.
From the Pulitzer Prize‚??winning author of Truman, here is the national bestselling epic chronicle of the creation of the Panama Canal. In The Path Between the Seas, acclaimed historian David McCullough delivers a first-rate drama of the sweeping human undertaking that led to the creation of this grand enterprise.

The Path Between the Seas tells the story of the men and women who fought against all odds to fulfill the 400-year-old dream of constructing an aquatic passageway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It is a story of astonishing engineering feats, tremendous medical accomplishments, political power plays, heroic successes, and tragic failures. Applying his remarkable gift for writing lucid, lively exposition, McCullough weaves the many strands of the momentous event into a comprehensive and captivating tale.

Winner of the National Book Award for history, the Francis Parkman Prize, the Samuel Eliot Morison Award, and the Cornelius Ryan Award (for the best book of the year on international affairs), The Path Between the Seas is a must-read for anyone interested in American history, the history of technology, international intrigue, and human

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