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The Disaster Artist: My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever… (2013)

by Greg Sestero, Tom Bissell

Other authors: See the other authors section.

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6053629,533 (4.15)15
Nineteen-year-old Greg Sestero met Tommy Wiseau at an acting school in San Francisco. Wiseau's scenes were rivetingly wrong, yet Sestero, hypnotized by such uninhibited acting, thought, "I have to do a scene with this guy." That impulse changed both of their lives. Wiseau seemed never to have read the rule book on interpersonal relationships (or the instructions on a bottle of black hair dye), yet he generously offered to put the aspiring actor up in his LA apartment. Sestero's nascent acting career first sizzled, then fizzled, resulting in Wiseau's last-second offer to Sestero of co-starring with him in The Room, a movie Wiseau wrote and planned to finance, produce, and direct-in the parking lot of a Hollywood equipment-rental shop. Wiseau spent $6 million of his own money on his film, but despite the efforts of the disbelieving (and frequently fired) crew and embarrassed (and frequently fired) actors, the movie made no sense. Nevertheless, Wiseau rented a Hollywood billboard featuring his alarming headshot and staged a red carpet premiere. The Room made $1,800 at the box office and closed after two weeks. One reviewer said that watching The Room was like "getting stabbed in the head". The Disaster Artist is Greg Sestero's laugh-out-loud funny account of how Tommy Wiseau defied every law of artistry, business, and friendship to make "the Citizen Kane of bad movies" (Entertainment Weekly), which is now an international phenomenon, with Wiseau himself beloved as an oddball celebrity. Written with award-winning journalist Tom Bissell, The Disaster Artist is an inspiring tour de force that reads like a page-turning novel, an open-hearted portrait of an enigmatic man who will improbably capture your heart.… (more)
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» See also 15 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
It's hard to get far into a discussion about the movie adaptation about a book without coming across the phrase "the book was better". [b:The Disaster Artist|17404078|The Disaster Artist My Life Inside The Room, the Greatest Bad Movie Ever Made|Greg Sestero|https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1373346749l/17404078._SY75_.jpg|24240845] is certainly different enough from its adaptation that it is worth picking up even if you've seen James Franco mumble his way though Tommy Wiseau. The relationship between Greg and Tommy is center stage here and the result is an interesting deconstruction of the relationship between two men who have seen each other at their best and and worst. ( )
  eshaundo | Feb 10, 2021 |
I read this on a flight, and it made for an entertaining journey. If you're a fan of The Room, this reads exactly like the behind-the-scenes you always hoped existed. It's chalked full of amazing Wiseauisms and maintains a Very Funny level all the way through. I'm going to need to watch The Room again in light of having read this book to keep an eye out for all the gaffs.

All jokes aside though, Sestero obviously has a soft-spot in his heart for Wiseau, and he brilliantly portrays everyone's favorite punching-bag exceptionally sympathetically. This book has enough Feels to have taught me something about friendship.

If you're interested, here are the quotes I liked from the book:
http://sandymaguire.me/books/greg-sestero-and-tom-bissell-the-disaster-artist.ht... ( )
  isovector | Dec 13, 2020 |
This is a book that really, really benefits from watching The Room before reading this. Reading Tommy quotes just isn't the same if you're not familiar with his voice/accent/intonation. Reading descriptions of scenes doesn't replace seeing them unfold. You aren't craving explanation the same way.

Another book made worse by insisting on a non-linear narrative despite being a non-fiction behind-the-scenes book.

Its a fascinating story with several mysteries that are never rightly solved. We never get a definite answer for Tommy's age (the ID is suspect), origin, or funding source. To be fair, though, I don't think even Tommy telling us would provide a definite answer.

It is an interesting character study. The relationship between Greg and Tommy is so blatantly unhealthy. Tommy is manipulative and abusive. Greg is manipulative and duplicitous. They each take advantage of each other - and they each clearly see each other as possessing qualities and opportunities they personally lack. They live vicariously through each other while simultaneously undermining and competing with each other. You both understand why they can't seem to split up, while screaming at Greg to just get out already, leave, why are you still together?! ( )
  kaitlynn_g | Dec 13, 2020 |
amongst all the goofiness and tension, kinda resonated with the idea that your successes and your dreams and your triumphs are first and foremost for yourself; your work is the only thing to measure up against. but also tommy wiseau sounds like a nightmare-human ( )
  Chyvalrys | Aug 5, 2020 |
4.5/5 ( )
  autumnrain87 | Jul 31, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sestero, Gregprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bissell, Tommain authorall editionsconfirmed
Archer, AkashaDesignersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Staehle, WillCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Imagine a movie so incomprehensible that you find yourself compelled to watch it over and over again.
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David and Donna were scene partners in Jean Shelton's class, and also extremely nice people, but they were in growing danger of raising Samuel Beckett from the dead and compelling him to stomp through San Francisco like Godzilla.
He was friendly and funny most of the time—though his work on The Room nearly drove him mad. Years later Sandy would claim to have directed the lion’s share of The Room, which is a bit like claiming to have been the Hindenburg’s principal aeronautics engineer.
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Nineteen-year-old Greg Sestero met Tommy Wiseau at an acting school in San Francisco. Wiseau's scenes were rivetingly wrong, yet Sestero, hypnotized by such uninhibited acting, thought, "I have to do a scene with this guy." That impulse changed both of their lives. Wiseau seemed never to have read the rule book on interpersonal relationships (or the instructions on a bottle of black hair dye), yet he generously offered to put the aspiring actor up in his LA apartment. Sestero's nascent acting career first sizzled, then fizzled, resulting in Wiseau's last-second offer to Sestero of co-starring with him in The Room, a movie Wiseau wrote and planned to finance, produce, and direct-in the parking lot of a Hollywood equipment-rental shop. Wiseau spent $6 million of his own money on his film, but despite the efforts of the disbelieving (and frequently fired) crew and embarrassed (and frequently fired) actors, the movie made no sense. Nevertheless, Wiseau rented a Hollywood billboard featuring his alarming headshot and staged a red carpet premiere. The Room made $1,800 at the box office and closed after two weeks. One reviewer said that watching The Room was like "getting stabbed in the head". The Disaster Artist is Greg Sestero's laugh-out-loud funny account of how Tommy Wiseau defied every law of artistry, business, and friendship to make "the Citizen Kane of bad movies" (Entertainment Weekly), which is now an international phenomenon, with Wiseau himself beloved as an oddball celebrity. Written with award-winning journalist Tom Bissell, The Disaster Artist is an inspiring tour de force that reads like a page-turning novel, an open-hearted portrait of an enigmatic man who will improbably capture your heart.

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