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City of Woe

by Christopher Ryan

Series: Mallory and Gunner (1)

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What if Paul Farrington, a veteran fixer for a shady corporation, found himself targeted for elimination just as he was trying to finance his daughter's Ivy League education? How far would he go to provide for his family and keep them safe? What if detectives Frank Mallory and Alberto "Gunner" Gennaro were forced to play catch up with a killer who may or may not be a demon and who leaves trails of Dantesque murders, each one occurring further south in Manhattan and deeper into his version of The Inferno? How could these situations be connected?How long can the detectives stick to strict police procedural facts when confronted with increasingly bizarre events, especially once they begin invading Mallory's private life? And how does he find a balance between his rejection of the case's alleged demonic elements and his strong desire to believe his dying father's visions of long dead relatives beckoning him to heaven? When must a detective reconsider what exists outside man's law?These are the dominant concerns of City of Woe, a novel combining Ryan's personal experiences, knowledge of the family business (the NYPD), an understanding of literary classics and a love for classic rock and roll. Running 327 double-spaced manuscript pages, readers have noted obvious references to Dante's The Inferno, subtle nods to Joyce's Dubliners and Ulysses and the influences of Elmore Leonard, Walter Mosley, and Richard Price.… (more)
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I was asked to give an honest opinion of this book. It took me a bit to get into the plot but once I did I was hooked. Its a great read. The ending could have been beefed up a bit, but all in all worth reading. I look forward to more Mallory and Gunner stories. ( )
  KerryMarsh | Apr 22, 2013 |
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What if Paul Farrington, a veteran fixer for a shady corporation, found himself targeted for elimination just as he was trying to finance his daughter's Ivy League education? How far would he go to provide for his family and keep them safe? What if detectives Frank Mallory and Alberto "Gunner" Gennaro were forced to play catch up with a killer who may or may not be a demon and who leaves trails of Dantesque murders, each one occurring further south in Manhattan and deeper into his version of The Inferno? How could these situations be connected?How long can the detectives stick to strict police procedural facts when confronted with increasingly bizarre events, especially once they begin invading Mallory's private life? And how does he find a balance between his rejection of the case's alleged demonic elements and his strong desire to believe his dying father's visions of long dead relatives beckoning him to heaven? When must a detective reconsider what exists outside man's law?These are the dominant concerns of City of Woe, a novel combining Ryan's personal experiences, knowledge of the family business (the NYPD), an understanding of literary classics and a love for classic rock and roll. Running 327 double-spaced manuscript pages, readers have noted obvious references to Dante's The Inferno, subtle nods to Joyce's Dubliners and Ulysses and the influences of Elmore Leonard, Walter Mosley, and Richard Price.

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