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Twentysomething Essays by Twentysomething Writers (2006)

by Matt Kellogg (Editor), Jillian Quint (Editor)

Other authors: Radhiyah Ayobami (Contributor), Eula Biss (Contributor), Emma Black (Contributor), Katherine Dykstra (Contributor), Mary Beth Ellis (Contributor)24 more, Elrena Evans (Contributor), John Fischer (Contributor), Miellyn Fitzwater (Contributor), Mary Kate Frank (Contributor), Joey Franklin (Contributor), Jennifer Glaser (Contributor), Shahnaz Habib (Contributor), Eli James (Contributor), Rachel Kempf (Contributor), Colleen Kinder (Contributor), Jess Lacher (Contributor), Bronson Lemer (Contributor), Marisa McCarthy (Contributor), Kate McGovern (Contributor), Kyle Minor (Contributor), Lauren Monroe (Contributor), Luke Mullins (Contributor), Brendan Park (Contributor), Christopher Poling (Contributor), Kathleen Rooney (Contributor), Travis Sentell (Contributor), Theodora Stites (Contributor), Burlee Vang (Contributor), J. W. Young (Contributor)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
772312,742 (3.73)1
Selected as the winners of Random House's national contest, a stunning collection of essays ranging from comic to poignant, personal to political, by the brightest young writers you haven't heard of . . . yet. Here, for the first time, current twentysomethings come together on their own terms, in their own words, and begin to define this remarkably diverse and self-aware generation. Tackling an array of subjects-career, family, sex, religion, technology, art-they form a vibrant, unified community while simultaneously proving that there is no typical twentysomething experience. In this collection, a young father works the late-night shift at Wendy's, learning the finer points of status, teamwork, and french fries. An artist's nude model explains why she's happy to be viewed as an object. An international relief worker wrestles with his choices as he starts to resent the very people who need his help the most. A devout follower of Joan Didion explains what New York means to her. And a young army engineer spends his time in Kuwait futilely trying to grow a mustache like his dad's. With grace, wit, humor, and urgency, these writers invite us into their lives and into their heads. Twentysomething Essays by Twentysomething Writers is a rich, provocative read as well as a bold statement from a generation just now coming into its own, including these essays "California" by Jess Lacher "The Waltz" by Mary Beth Ellis "The Mustache Race" by Bronson Lemer "Sex and the Sickbed" by Jennifer Glaser "Tricycle" by Rachel Kempf "Prime-Time You" by John Fischer "Backlash" by Shahnaz Habib "Think Outside the Box but Stay Inside the Grid" by Emma Black "Finding the Beat" by Eli James "You Shall Go out with Joy and be Led Forth with Peace" by Kyle Minor "The Idiot's Guide to Your Palm" by Colleen Kinder "Sheer Dominance" by Christopher Poling "Live Nude Girl" by Kathleen Rooney "An Evening in April" by Radhiyah Ayobami "Cliché Rape Story" by Marisa McCarthy "Rock my Network" by Theodora Stites "Goodbye to All That" by Eula Biss "All the Right Answers" by Brendan Park "Why I Had To Leave" by Luke Mullins "In-Between Places" by Mary Kate Frank "A Red Spoon for the Nameless" by Burlee Vang "My Little Comma" by Elrena Evans "Fight Me" by Miellyn Fitzwater "The Secret Lives of My Parents" by Kate McGovern "My Roaring Twenties" by Lauren Monroe "In, From the Outside" by Katherine Dykstra "The Mysteries of Life . . . Revealed!" by Travis Sentell "So You Say You Want a Revolution" by J. W. Young "Working at Wendy's" by Joey Franklin Praise for Twentysomething Essays by Twentysomething Writers "Being in your twenties is weird. The world tells you you're a grown-up, but damn if you feel like one. With 29 sharply observant and well-written snapshots of life between the ages of 19 and 30, Twentysomething Essays by Twentysomething Writers couldn't have captured this more perfectly."-Nylon "You'll devour this compilation of essays by funny, smart, insightful young writers in just a few hours."-Jane Magazine "If we are still looking for a voice for this generation, I'd nominate this eclectic choir instead."-Orlando Sentinel… (more)
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Showing 2 of 2
I've been on an essay kick lately so picked this up at the library. There were a few engaging essays and a lot of chaff. Though I will say that even the uninteresting ones were well written. It seems this was a contest of some sort and the introduction gives you the idea that this collection contains essays written by people of all occupations and world views. Browsing the author notes in the back though I see most of them are actually people already in the writing field or having studied it in school. That let me down a little in believing that it was a cross section of what people in their twenties think and deal with. All in all, it was okay. Something to pick up and read here and there but not a must have. ( )
  kanata | Apr 11, 2010 |
I found this book difficult to put down. As a 27 year old, feeling that my 20s are starting to slip away, but still far enough away from my 30s, I worry that my generation is polarizing. We have put so much emphasis on college that we seem to have lost touch with the "real world". There are a lot of humurous and depressing stories here, all blazingly real. I most related to stories about the lack of mystery or surprises or over-romanticism of so much of our lives-whether sex, work, family and where we will live. Even more so than previous generations, we are a transient vagabond generation, some finding refuge in consumerism, others finding identity in rebelling against consumerism (a la Adbusters). You will find stories dealing with rape, depression, working at Wendy's, living at home, traveling, queer issues, race issues, schools, poverty, etc. An actually enjoyable anthology, not flippant or over-reaching to be hip at all, I highly recommend it. ( )
  TheBonnieG | Dec 18, 2006 |
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kellogg, MattEditorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Quint, JillianEditormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Ayobami, RadhiyahContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Biss, EulaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Black, EmmaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Dykstra, KatherineContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ellis, Mary BethContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Evans, ElrenaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fischer, JohnContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Fitzwater, MiellynContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Frank, Mary KateContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Franklin, JoeyContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Glaser, JenniferContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Habib, ShahnazContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
James, EliContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kempf, RachelContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kinder, ColleenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lacher, JessContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lemer, BronsonContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
McCarthy, MarisaContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
McGovern, KateContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Minor, KyleContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Monroe, LaurenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Mullins, LukeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Park, BrendanContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Poling, ChristopherContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Rooney, KathleenContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Sentell, TravisContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Stites, TheodoraContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Vang, BurleeContributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Young, J. W.Contributorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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Selected as the winners of Random House's national contest, a stunning collection of essays ranging from comic to poignant, personal to political, by the brightest young writers you haven't heard of . . . yet. Here, for the first time, current twentysomethings come together on their own terms, in their own words, and begin to define this remarkably diverse and self-aware generation. Tackling an array of subjects-career, family, sex, religion, technology, art-they form a vibrant, unified community while simultaneously proving that there is no typical twentysomething experience. In this collection, a young father works the late-night shift at Wendy's, learning the finer points of status, teamwork, and french fries. An artist's nude model explains why she's happy to be viewed as an object. An international relief worker wrestles with his choices as he starts to resent the very people who need his help the most. A devout follower of Joan Didion explains what New York means to her. And a young army engineer spends his time in Kuwait futilely trying to grow a mustache like his dad's. With grace, wit, humor, and urgency, these writers invite us into their lives and into their heads. Twentysomething Essays by Twentysomething Writers is a rich, provocative read as well as a bold statement from a generation just now coming into its own, including these essays "California" by Jess Lacher "The Waltz" by Mary Beth Ellis "The Mustache Race" by Bronson Lemer "Sex and the Sickbed" by Jennifer Glaser "Tricycle" by Rachel Kempf "Prime-Time You" by John Fischer "Backlash" by Shahnaz Habib "Think Outside the Box but Stay Inside the Grid" by Emma Black "Finding the Beat" by Eli James "You Shall Go out with Joy and be Led Forth with Peace" by Kyle Minor "The Idiot's Guide to Your Palm" by Colleen Kinder "Sheer Dominance" by Christopher Poling "Live Nude Girl" by Kathleen Rooney "An Evening in April" by Radhiyah Ayobami "Cliché Rape Story" by Marisa McCarthy "Rock my Network" by Theodora Stites "Goodbye to All That" by Eula Biss "All the Right Answers" by Brendan Park "Why I Had To Leave" by Luke Mullins "In-Between Places" by Mary Kate Frank "A Red Spoon for the Nameless" by Burlee Vang "My Little Comma" by Elrena Evans "Fight Me" by Miellyn Fitzwater "The Secret Lives of My Parents" by Kate McGovern "My Roaring Twenties" by Lauren Monroe "In, From the Outside" by Katherine Dykstra "The Mysteries of Life . . . Revealed!" by Travis Sentell "So You Say You Want a Revolution" by J. W. Young "Working at Wendy's" by Joey Franklin Praise for Twentysomething Essays by Twentysomething Writers "Being in your twenties is weird. The world tells you you're a grown-up, but damn if you feel like one. With 29 sharply observant and well-written snapshots of life between the ages of 19 and 30, Twentysomething Essays by Twentysomething Writers couldn't have captured this more perfectly."-Nylon "You'll devour this compilation of essays by funny, smart, insightful young writers in just a few hours."-Jane Magazine "If we are still looking for a voice for this generation, I'd nominate this eclectic choir instead."-Orlando Sentinel

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